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Hi everyone welcome my name is Cassie Eng and this is Robert Vargas We're 5th year PhD Candidates  in the Psychology Department We're here to give you a virtual  tour of the Psychology Department   and everything our program has to offer There are three core disciplines  in our department: cognitive,   developmental, and health/social   but just because you're in one discipline doesn't  mean your research is secluded to that area  For example, my research is with children so  my area of work is considered developmental   but I also use neuroimaging and focus on  attentional processes, overlapping heavily   with cognitive. I also implement exercise based  interventions which is more health-related.  If there's one word to describe our  department it would be interdisciplinary.  You'll leave here well-rounded with knowledge  and skills in many overlapping areas. Even though we don't have  a clinical discipline that   doesn't necessarily mean you can't work  with clinical populations. For example,   my advisor Erik Thiessen collaborates with child  psychiatrists at the University of Pittsburgh   and works with pediatric populations at risk  for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.   Marcel Just works with populations  with Autism Spectrum Disorder   and suicidal youth, and Marlene Behrmann works  with patients with epilepsy and prosopagnosia. You'll also notice that our  department is relatively small   and tight-knit. By the time you  graduate you'll probably know   everyone and they'll know you too. I've seen graduate student cohorts   ranging from 3 to 10 people, but  the typical size is around 4 to 5.  This is good because it fosters more of a  cooperative over competitive environment Let's head into Baker Hall though.  This building is where the  Psychology Department is located.  Better hurry it's a little chilly outside  Welcome to Baker Hall!  Wait safety first I need to *suit up* Okay we're good.  This is where your office  and the majority of classes,   lab spaces, faculty, and staff are. You'll see  that Baker Hall is unique in that it's a very   lonnnnng building but I love it because  it kind of reminds me of a train station   like Platform 9 and 3/4 from Harry  Potter or a really fancy airport. Some spaces are on the bottom  floor, some are on the second floor,   but majority of the Psychology spaces are on  the third floor which is where we're heading  WOAH watch your step! We could take the   elevator but I'm trying to get my steps in Today on this tour I'm going to show you all   around Baker Hall, Margaret Morrison which is a  5 minute walk from here where the developmental   labs are, the University Center right next to  Margaret Morrison which has a lot of resources   for graduate students, and the Mellon Institute  a few blocks away where our fMRI facilities are oops... ignore the camera man Okay let's head into the Graduate  Student Wing where all of our offices are This is the Grad Wing look at this hot AND cold water mmMm luxury  nice microwave bunch of offices here's a nice little where are  people... where are they now?! When you are a 2nd+ year you  get your own office space  This is just a nice little preview  of what grad students typically do  We go to conferences together  this was at infancy conference This is in Montreal in Canada We also went to Potterfest After  Dark* in one of the museums here There's also the CNBC retreat which is... Robert where is it again?  It's typically held at Seven Springs which  is a ski resort outside of Pittsburgh  We also.... we go to the club This is before ~the club~  and we also go to bars and breweries  so this was after Kevin Jarbo defended  We also support some of our students who  are actually musicians so Jeanean is... (crowd cheering) ah there she is! Jeanean is actually  in a band, so we all go and support her  And we also have socials! This is my cohort ooOOOoo  This is the rest of my cohort and we do fun things like celebrate halloween together  Pre-pandemic, but point is we have a lot of fun This is my area you can see it's  you know personally decorated  We have some uh necessities  like paint, and... glitter?  Coffee machine (Obligatory) whiteboard  Oh hey Robert! What are you doing there? heyyy just doing some grad school work  The department will actually give you a  monitor [/desktop or laptop] if you want and as you can see here our desk can also  be adjusted so if you want a standing desk   that can also be arranged we like to sit so   we just have our basic sitting desks This is the first year office this is where you'll be staying  and you get to choose your office space  and you'll get keys where you can lock   up secure things on top of your  desk and in your filing cabinets My favorite part about this space is definitely   the blackboard so this is where  you can ~express yourselves~ I honestly don't know where this dinosaur came  from (dinosaur roar) but it has been here since   I started grad school and so yeah this is  just a fun space where you'll get super   close with your cohort and you can just  come here and do work or just hang out Let's have a nice cameo from our 4th years!  Also, I am so jealous of this office... This   couch mMm you know so you can just take  nice little catnaps throughout the day  This must be I want to say Patience's desk "Writing Systems of the World" ... classic Patience: Hi! We are the 4th year  cohort my name is Patience Stevens  I study the processes behind learning  how to read using both computational and   developmental methods and I work with David Plaut I'm also in the Program for Interdisciplinary   Education Research (PIER) and I am the coordinator   for the Graduate Outreach Program Krista: Hi I'm Krista Bond I work with   Tim Verstynen and I study decision-making  and generalization and decision making   and I like running and coffee  and biking and climbing Jeanean: Hi i'm Jeanean I work with Vicki  Helgeson and I look at racial and cultural   differences in the link between social support  and health and I picked up roller skating so   yeah these are my roller skates Phoebe: Hi Pho or Phoebe, she and/or they  pronunciaries, either is good with me It's been 4 years I still find y'all so cool Holy $h!t ya'll are so cool I study causal cognition with David Rakison  and David Danks so I look at the processes   and representations by which humans learn  about causation and what leads us astray   so I work with technically both adults and babies In my free time I like to read my most recent   favorite is just anything by N.K. Jemisin I will swear by this book   and anything that's by her and yeah happy to see you all...   OH and yeah if you're a first year there is  a high chance that you will come into contact   with me and you'll have to bear all of my emails  because I help with first year things... sometimes  Jeanean: Yeah we're all pretty involved in the  department so like Patience said she's in the   Outreach Program, she coordinates that. Krista is a GSA rep  Cassie: GSA stands for the Graduate Student  Assembly which is CMU's student-run government   which i'll talk about a little later Jeanean: I am the ~Gradvocate~   and Phoebe is a Faculty Rep. Patience: Excited to meet you all!  Jeanean: bye! Krista: bye!  Phoebe: bye! COME Something you'll notice throughout  this tour of our department is the   artwork hanging around the hallways This sculpture is something that I   actually built in my first year and these  were pieces donated from our IT Department   but this lit up brain here and these lights they were actually ordered by Mike Tarr,   our Department Head Something that's really   important in graduate school is having hobbies,  having a really good work-life balance.   For me, that is painting, drawing, and sculpting. and the department is really supportive of that  Throughout this tour you'll see a lot of my  artwork that is tied to the science in this   department but it's also just a reminder  that work-life balance is really important   and having hobbies and having a life outside  of research is so important for mental health Let's take a look at another wing in Baker Hall This is Jessica Cantlon's office  Using fMRI she looks at the intraparietal  sulcus of young children doing numerical tasks   and what she found is that boys and  girls actually show identical abilities Something super bada$$ about  Jessica's office is this  She was actually named Times  Person of the Year in 2017.  This right here my friends, these are goals. One day, I hope to have my own portrait in my   office blown up on the cover of a magazine  for making a difference in the world Let's take a look at another space This is Brad Mahon's research lab space  Classic whiteboard. Actually, this is genius  I would love to have a whiteboard wall   behind my working computer but Brad's lab studies  how object concepts are represented and organized   in the human brain... and no I did not just  write that on the chalkboard to remember it  We have a nice view of campus from here wow, that's-that's a nice chair this is where his space is you can see that there's some  nice lighting, nice setup Something really cool about Brad's  research is that he actually provided   evidence that football injuries,  routine hits, damage the brain Pause. On the left is the Core Staff Wing This is Erin Donahoe's office.  Erin is very, very special She does a lot of things for   the graduate students like organizing  visiting weekend She's also who you   email any inquiries about the program and she's  also someone that you can go to and confide in  I've definitely sat on this couch  before just you know venting  This is one of my favorite things: the yoga ball You can see here that she has  all students dissertations here   and she's just another friendly face in the  department who you can go to as a resource I can't cover all of the Core Psychology Staff but  someone who I do want to talk about is Nick Pegg  Nick Pegg is our IT person for the entire  department and he has made a significant   difference for the graduate students, for  the staff, for the undergraduate students  Nick will hook you up with your new  laptop when you get into the program  Some of you may know that a large  part of academia is presentations,   which also means printing posters, which  is what this GIGANTIC MACHINE is here  Procrastination 101. There has definitely been  times where I have been making posters last minute   and the rule on paper is that you need to get Nick  your posters 48 hours in advance, which I think   is already generous and there has definitely  been times when I have emailed Nick in a panic   being like Nick, I need a poster printed my flight  is leaving and he will have it printed in seconds  What I'd like to emphasize is that  he doesn't need to do that, right?  He could email me the next day and be like well  too bad, so sad print it at the conference venue  but he doesn't, so he really goes out  of his way to help the graduate students  He will also make sure if you need SPSS or  MATLAB on your computer for your research or   any other technological resources he is the  go-to person and he will hook you up so he   is another really important resource in the  department and someone who is also very special Pause. On the right is Marlene Behrmann's office This is Marlene Behrmann and she was actually   the first female faculty member at CMU to be  elected into the National Academy of Sciences These are brain lobectomies that I've  painted from Marlene Behrmann's research   These were actually performed on  children to end epileptic seizures I remember my first time sitting in  Marlene's office I noticed that there   were these tupperwares on this desk and  what i thought was her lunch were actually   real human brains so you can see that these are  slices of both hemispheres and this right here is   an actual human brain how cool is this also lol  do not eat but yeah marlene is amazing she is   one of the faculty that i have reached out to  many times just emailing if i could get her   feedback on my research she is not in my area  of research but she still takes the time to   talk and give feedback about my work which i  think is really important and something special   pause on the left is 336b our main conference  room and on the right is the psychology lounge   ecology lounge is where we have most  talks visiting faculty colliquid   speakers and job talks something unique  about our program is that we don't have quals   that's right no qualification exams instead  in our first years in the program we give   presentations also known as brown bags on our  research in front of the department i know   this can sound intimidating but coming into  grad school i had really bad speech anxiety   i'm talking shaking hands shaky voice basically  reading from my slides and avoiding the audience   now as a more marinated graduate student i've  given 28 oral presentations at conferences and   invited talks at other universities brown  bags and giving talks within the department   and getting feedback from the faculty and students  will strengthen your presentation skills so that   when you do present outside of cmu you'll be more  than prepared you also take a presentation course   with two faculty in our department which will  help you prep for brown bags and you'll also give   and receive feedback to your cohort and will be  given a lot of support from the graduate students this is the psychology lounge this is a nice  communal place where we have a fridge and freezer   sink to wash your hands coffee maker microwave  toaster oven and all of our mailboxes and hell   yeah we recycle but this is just a nice place  where you can hang out do work and you can also   hold office hours here when you are ta okay so  let's take a tour down another part of baker this   is vicki helgeson's office our graduate director  who you've already met me as well as several   graduate students have been to vicki's office  before she is who you go to if you are having any   conflicts or any issues in the program or in life  and she will give you the best advice for your   professional development and she will look out for  your interests she's also very responsive which   i think is important for any graduate director so  if you email her she will respond to you within   the day another fun fact about vicky is that  she will ask you what your favorite cookies are   and she will take that on as a challenge and she  will bake them she's also very inclusive so if you   are vegan or gluten-free she will bake them that  way which i think is something special about vicky pause on the left we have david creswell's  lab space which we'll visit in a few minutes   and the psychology reception office also   known as the fishbowl because it's  surrounded by glass hey queen bee since we're virtual i am gonna take my mask off  it'll be nice to meet all you folks whenever you   might get here uh my name is becky finkel and i am  the receptionist and the facilities coordinator in   psychology i provide office supplies to the entire  department anytime there are facilities issues   you know the light goes out your heater's not  working whatever that would be me you would call   and i'm also very important for grad students  i do your expense reports so whenever the grad   students spend money i'm the person to come to  to try to get it back okay so just emphasizing   how important becky is so yes becky takes care  of all of our reimbursements so when you travel   for conferences she will get that reimbursement  back to you within a few days which is amazing   very very quick turnaround also endless supply  of paper and supplies i would like to just say   that this is like target on crack look at all  of these things um pens in every colors sharpies   staples and there's even stamps and postage look  at this we will hook you up next to becky's office   are our printer and scanner facilities so if you  need to mask copy and print consent forms for   participants or exams for tn classes these  are connected wirelessly to our laptops okay so we're just gonna take a  tour in one of our social labs oh what a surprise we have  a cameo from david creswell   hey everybody welcome to my lab this is the  340 wing we have a number of rooms here where   we do a lot of work related to stress and  coping and stress management interventions so   oftentimes you'll see people coming from the  community end and looking around kind of wondering   where they should go typically they need to go to  my lab so you'll send them down to this wing here   and i just want to say welcome um i know this  is unusual to have virtual tours but uh we're   delighted to have you and certainly i think by the  time you're you're coming here to start classes   we'll all be back in person and uh hopefully  you and i can sit right here at the table   uh in the 340 wing and have a conversation but  it's a wonderful place we really hope that you'll   uh you'll come here and um uh that i hope you  enjoy this tour cassie i'm sure is crushing it   she and i take group x classes and uh uh those  are exercise classes that are offered on campus   so maybe you'll come join us um again welcome and  i'll hopefully see you around soon okay everybody   we thought we'd give you just a short tour of  the the 340 wing lab space that uh that folks   in my lab work in so this is one of the testing  rooms this is one of our all-purpose rooms we do a   whole lot of stuff in here uh you can see there's  a giant freezer in there a lot of times we'll   do we could drive blood spots and saliva sampling  and other things here so this you can't see it we   have a sink in here so that that helps with some  of you know some of the work that we do and uh so   biological assays and specimens come through this  room commonly all right let's go down the hallway   okay this is one of our our call rooms we do a lot  of community randomized control trials where we   offer stress management programs and typically we  have a study hotline where people are calling in   and we are talking to people out in the community  this is a lot of times where that works happening   and you'll see there's some cushions there  we do these different meditation studies so   there's always meditation cushions in our lab   all right we're moving here um this is  uh my project managers room we've got   um two of these i've got three three full-time  staff um uh really running the show in my lab   and uh working on coordinating different projects  and so they do get a window don't tell anybody all right we're going down the hall this is one  of our our testing rooms it has a lot of different   physiological assessment equipment it's kind of  a flex room it changes with every every studies   every couple months we're reconfiguring it  but it's a great way to work with community   participants all right there's a classroom right  there and then right here this is our other   uh lead project manager room we've got folks  that come in that research assistants that work   side by side with our project managers and yes  there's a window uh this is the postdoc office um   and uh and special faculty  office judy thatcher is my   um lab director she sort of tells everybody  what to do she's got a beautiful set up there   and sometimes shares office space with other post  dogs but i don't see anybody in there right now   probably been pretty quiet in fact i'm  imagining it's pretty dusty because i know   janine is off working virtually as is everybody  in my lab and we've got a couple of other testing   rooms but i think that's a nice general tour  to give you a sense for uh for our layout   this is our main lab room here we have whole test  banks of computers with physiological recording   equipment and there's some holes that we punched  in that wall uh that allow us to use this adjacent   room really as a really nice testing room we've  got video equipment set up and a lot of times   we'll do tree or social stress tests and we'll do  laboratory stress challenges in here of various   kinds and uh it's got a separate door for people  to go in and out of so really nice setup thanks   cassie thanks uh hope you enjoyed the virtual  tour and uh i hope you come see it in person   so these are tonatopic maps from rory holt's lab  who studies auditory perception but bobby klotzky   is the one who actually helped me calculate the  visual angle so you can see that your perspective   based on where you're standing changes so a  lot of our faculty also have a lot of overlap   with electrical computer engineering  and human computer interactions so   this is bobby klatsky she was actually the  first woman head of our psychology department pause on the right is our eeg lab and  on the left is our department head suite when you walk in you'll be greeted by ginger  my tar's assistant ginger can help you with   basically anything a fun and useful experience  graduate students can do is volunteer to host   faculty candidates so if you choose to do that  you work closely with ginger and planning out   their schedules on the left here is kathy magers  our business manager she handles all of our monies   so if you're awarded external grants or have any  questions about research finances kathy is your   go-to ginger also always has bowls of candies on  her desk and people pop by to grab a few pieces   okay on to mike tarr's office mike tara is our  department head i think a good word to describe   mike is progressive he schedules meetings with  the graduate students at least once a year to   listen if we have any issues or concerns about  the program he adjusts our stipends for inflation   and typically raises them and our annual travel  funds each year and even allocated a few hundred   dollars of annual discretionary funds for graduate  each graduate student because he genuinely cares   about our livelihoods he's also open-minded for  change to give you an example robert vargas and   i proposed to mike tara to start a diverse  recruitment committee within the department   to establish our presence at recruitment events  for students from underrepresented minority and   disadvantaged backgrounds he completely  supported this initiative and allocated   funds for these efforts which we hope will  continue on with graduate students like you welcome to the eeg lab this eeg lab is  special because it's communal meaning   if you come into the program  and you want to use eeg you can we have at least 102 channel caps and over here  are where the experimenters or the researchers can   run and program their experiments and over here  on the left is where our caps and the electrodes   are hung eeg is super cool because high temporal  resolution non-invasive relatively inexpensive   and this is where the participant sits and it's  your classic setup of the psychology experimenter   able to watch as the participant is being tested  so you know the classic selective attention test   where there's a bunch of basketball players  and the basketball player is wearing white   you're counting how many times they're passing  the ball to each other but while this happens   there's either a gorilla or bear who kind of  just like chills in the middle but you don't   notice him because you are too busy counting the  basketballs well we replicated this and it didn't   work probably because beau powers who was one of  david plowed students was a foot taller than all   of us but this is just something fun that we did  in baker hall and i had to share it with someone   so this is actually an image from tim verstein's  laboratory of diffusion tensor imaging i think i   painted in my second year but tim actually teaches  a data science course for all graduate students   where you learn how to program an r and i came  to cmu with little to no programming background   and now as a fifth year almost graduating i am  a fluent programmer in both r and matlab and   i feel very confident in my statistic abilities  but it's primarily because of tim's class so   if you're like me where you start graduate school  and your last statistics class was actually   in your junior year in undergrad and you  kind of forgot what a t-test or an anova is   that shouldn't discourage you at all from  you know being in graduate school because   our department will give you the resources and  the instructors to help you learn that material   okay we are heading over to margaret morrison from  baker hall and on the way there we are stopping at   the number garden one of my favorite places on  campus so some of the big words that you hear   are things like big data and machine learning  and artificial intelligence but when you leave   cmu you will know what those terms mean and  you'll probably even use them in your research   cmu is a very tech heavy school and it's for a  good reason and now i present to you a margaret morrison   the children's school's primary role is to  facilitate research in developmental psychology   and any related fields the children's school  has a whole wing of laboratories where   faculty members conduct research and our job  is to have children available for that research   children ages 3 4 and 5. our other job is to  help improve the research by helping the faculty   members graduate students and their research teams  to better understand children and think about the   best ways to get the data that they want in order  to answer the research questions that they have   i have been working with the children's  school conducting research studies here   for about 14 years it allowed me to do some unique  studies that otherwise i wouldn't be able to do   for example to conduct longitudinal studies where  we can follow the same child over a period of   time and ask the same child many different  questions in many different situations yeah   okay so that was the children school which you  can see is attached to the developmental labs so this is where i do the majority of my research  as you can see um it is a game boy because i study   the effects of video games on children's  cognition so some of the videos from the   developmental labs look like they are straight  out of the blair witch project which is because   the developmental labs are recently renovated  brand new furniture brand new everything but   the power is also out due to said renovations  so i'm going to be showing you prior clips of   research in the labs something that i want  to highlight is how amazing sharon carver is   as you saw sharon carver is the director of the  children's school and she's also the associate   dean for academic affairs and the director of  the graduate fellowship program i'm in peer   on top of that she also teaches courses in the  learning sciences one of them being educational   goals instruction and assessment this class is one  of the most beneficial classes that i have ever   taken it teaches you evidence-based principles of  how students learn down and designing an entire   curriculum and a syllabus so actual formal  training on how to teach a class and the best   methods to do so sharon is also an excellent role  model and someone that you can go to and talk to   about anything she will genuinely have your best  interests at heart and she will look out for you   i can't tell you the amount of times i've  knocked on sharon's office directly next to the   developmental labs and she's dropped everything  she's working on and opened her door for me   in the lab there's also your classic double-sided  mirrors and we also have eye tracking and a lot of   access to technology there are lab spaces  for every single developmental faculty   so for bonnie nazari jessica catlin dan  yourofsky david rocketson er thiessen on a fisher   everyone has their own lab space and they  also typically also have a lab manager and   a research team that helps collect data so  aside from the children's school we also have   several several partnerships with schools in  and around pittsburgh where we actually go   into the schools and actually collect data david  rocketson and eric thiessen also do work with   infants so a lot of the times you'll see infants  and caregivers coming in and out of the lab   because we have partnerships with families around  the community as well so something important to   know about graduate school is that your advisor  will most likely make or break your experience   so my advisor anna fisher i feel very grateful  for because not a goal developmental but she does   scaffold so she doesn't hold my hand through  things and she gives me the perfect amount of   autonomy she's also very supportive something that  you learn in academia is that you need to develop   a tough skin and be okay with rejections and  experiments that don't go as planned because it   does happen often and that is science a tradition  that we started in the lab is we celebrate not   only acceptances and worked experiments but also  submissions and rejections so rather than kind of   moping around when something doesn't work and  just celebrating acceptances we also celebrate   rejections and attempted experiments just as  much and it just shows that she helps me build   resiliency and having a supportive environment is  so important so something the developmental lab   space has is functional near-infrared spectroscopy  also known as fmirs which uses low levels of light   to actually image the brain and it's really nice  for children and special populations because it's   less sensitive to motion artifacts compared to eeg  and children don't need to stay in a confined loud   environment and stay relatively immobile like fmri  like the eeg lab afners is also a communal space   where researchers who are interested in using it  do have access to it and it is a really nice tool   that we have here in the developmental lab spaces  something i want to emphasize about the community   is the undergraduate students so the undergraduate  students at carnegie mellon are some of the most   talented and skilled students that i've ever  worked with my research would definitely not be   possible without them so i currently mentor  a team of 15 undergraduate students ranging   from human computer interaction computer  science psychology computational neuroscience   working with them is definitely my favorite  part of the graduate student experience here   one of the biggest traditions at cmu is painting  the fence which is actually beating the guinness   world's records for the most painted object in the  world but this is one of the ways that students   express themselves here at the university  so these images were actually modeled off of   work in timber steinmann's lab and also by kevin  drabo so we're actually going to go visit kevin   in a university center next to margaret  morrison is the university center   this is where a lot of students can hang  out either outside or inside and do work   there's also tennis courts an indoor  swimming pool and a racquetball court   this is the university center so this is  where students come as sort of a central hub   in the university center there is a  center for student diversity and inclusion hey everyone i'm kevin jarville welcome  to the center let's take a tour come on in so hey everyone my name is kevin jarville i'm  currently a president's postdoctoral fellow in   the department of social and decision sciences  i'm also a phd psychology alum from the site   of the psych department here i used to work with  tim resigned in the colex lab and i'll be starting   a faculty position here at fall 2021 so looking  forward to seeing y'all when you get here another   thing that i do here on campus is i work part-time  in the center for student diversity inclusion   what we do is provide identity-based  support for all students on campus   so that they can navigate their life  here from the student affairs perspective   as well as an academic perspective  so as you look around the center   we have a lot of spaces where students can  come and congregate to get some work done   just to hang out and rejuvenate from the stresses  of daily campus life when you're surrounded by a   bunch of different professionals here in student  affairs who are able to support you in any ways   that you need so there's a ton of places to  work a ton of places to connect and a ton of   places to find yourself here at cmu so i'm looking  forward to seeing you all down here in the center   so this is kevin's office here in the center  hey again y'all so this is where i work on a   day-to-day basis when i'm here at the center for  student diversity and inclusion so students can   have one-on-one meetings with me sometimes i just  give up this space for them to come and hang out   if they need it but i also stationed up in porter  hall so if you get to campus and want to see me up   there that's a good place to visit so some of the  research that i do involved here at the university   is helping to co-direct the data driven diversity  lab or the d3 lab with dr cody menke who's also   with psychology a lot of the work that we do  there is based on studying stereotype threat   as well as the student spirit experiences  here on campus to see if we can find ways to   create new interventions that will help support  students and their success here at the university so one important thing i really want  to emphasize about what we do down here   at this center is provide identity-based  support for all of our students on campus   so this includes students from historically  underrepresented racial backgrounds   but also students who identify as lgbtq plus  whereas our first generation students a lot of   what we do supports the student organizations who  represent these different kinds of identities but   we also find ways to bring them together  and support them with a lot of innovative   programming and initiatives that support  their academic life here on campus as well   the university center is huge and there is a  lot of space to do work and hang out on the   top floor of the uc there is a graduate student  lounge that is exclusively for graduate students   so if you remember before earlier in this  video krista is the gsa representative for   the psychology department the graduate student  assembly is cmu's student body government and   they advocate on behalf of the graduate students  so each department at cmu has reps from each   of their departments and something special that  they do is they create spaces and they also plan   events specifically for graduate students so this  graduate student lounge was designed and input by   the graduate student assembly and it's really fun  because during the world cup or the super bowl   they're actually order food and put the game on  so graduate students can come and watch together   so in the university center we also have fitness  facilities so there is a weight room on the bottom   floor and there's cardio machines on the top  floor there's also group x classes so we have   studios upstairs that are free to all staff  and students they also have a brand new fitness   facilities in tepper school of business  which we'll go to in a few minutes   and by a few minutes i mean now so the temper  school of business is relatively new it is a   beautiful building and as i said they have brand  new fitness facilities and they also have studios   here too they are holding virtual remote fitness  classes but they are actually having them in   person just with a limited capacity and all  pandemic safety procedures in play but tepper   school of business is somewhere where the graduate  students go often to do work or just hang out   and it's really nice place both inside and  out and it is right across the street from   the university center which is really nice so if  you want a change of scenery here is the place   that you can go when you're on campus okay now for  our last stop let's head over to the bridge center   the bridge center is located in the melon  institute which is a few blocks away from   baker if you're taking any neuroscience classes  they'll most likely be in here and if you do   any fmri work this is also the building that  you'll visit quite often melon institute is a   relatively new bridge center and robert is  going to give you a tour of the facilities it's about um it's entering its second year it's  a really new facility so cmu originally had access   to a scanner over um at a building called queen  hall uh but that scanner is kind of um aged out   and we're sort of making transition to the group  center which the print center is a joint facility   um between cmu and university of pittsburgh uh  and it's here in the the mellon institute um which   is a building that's kind of about five to ten  minutes to walk away from you so let's do a tour um so uh moving onwards uh one facility uh  or one service that the scanner provides   is uh we have a mock scanner here um it's  currently under construction as you can see   but what this does is it allows you to essentially  run uh mock versions of your paradigm to your   participants um particularly participants who  haven't had a lot of experience participating in   mri studies or have had many mris um because for  those of you that have had one um it's a little   bit of an unnerving experience and so in order  to to give an opportunity for the participants to   become inoculated to the noise the feeling of  being a little bit claustrophobic and a bore   we can essentially run small mini versions  of your experiment here so let's move on   entering the mri suite um as you can see we  have a really nice unisex bathroom uh facilities   we have three practice rooms um we can  just look at an example of one real quick as you can see here they're generally empty  rooms with computers where you can run behavioral   pre-scan behavioral assessments or post-scan  debriefings pretty much whatever you want   there's plenty of space here here is  the computer room and there is a scanner   so we have a 3p prisma scanner  um we have capabilities with   channel 32 channel we have a bird cage and um i  think a 12 channel head coil uh and um in addition   to having the variety of these channel head coils  the scanner can do pretty high resolution imaging   like less than two millimeters um in addition to  that we have eye tracking capabilities um i know   we can get in scanner vitals information so things  like respiratory measures and uh heart rate um   yeah a number of labs here use uh various stimulus  presentation software so everything from e-prime   to psyctool box to using python based presentation  software in addition to that a couple labs also   use uh bins formatting so that infrastructure can  be built into your data acquisition sequence um   we also have an amazing mri tech yes hey scott  scott is a hero um and so if we want to take   a peek inside the scandal or you can't see  don't lose your phone hold on to it tight um   yeah and uh during the pandemic uh we have  sanitize everything the safety protocols   are incredibly strict like i said no  one is here unless they belong here i think that just about covers it it's a new  facility it's incredibly nice um yeah the the   directors and the people who help coordinate the  technologists um you can work with better people   and look how participant friendly this scanner is  beautiful anything else you'd like to add scott robert touched on it but this is  basically the presentation side   we also have uh ways to do blood pressure  to do temperature to do heart rate   like robert said multiple multiple ways to respond  with button gloves we have an eye tracking system   um from yeah brand new eye tracking system  and i guess on the on the software end i'm   not sure if this has been implemented yet but i  know there is uh a coordinated effort to create   kind of like a centralized github repository  for various labs to kind of share their their um   aspects of their pipeline whether it be image  processing or kind of data formatting um so yeah   it's it's it's a modern state-of-the-art  facility and uh yeah it's great to work here   thank you scott so much thanks robert so right  next to baker hall is actually flagstaff hill   so our campus is right next to this  beautiful park where you can have picnics   and hang out throw a frisbee just soak in the sun  right over there is actually phipps conservatory   where they conduct research so if you're wondering  what the graduate students have been doing   outside of research in the pandemic we have  socially distanced lunches virtual happy hours   game night we love jack box games and  among us we also hang out in our virtual   graduate wing look how cute  we are sitting by the fire we really hope you enjoyed this tour and   we hope you can join our community  and be here at carnegie mellon   welcome to the developmental lab space uh patients they're doing some renovations so  maybe we're going to film this like film little   haunted house file it's going to be in the dark  found that is exclusively for graduate students what oh yeah we're pretty cool and  we might be the coolest cohort   you know don't tell anyone that's  on the dl but if you come here   maybe you can be part of the next coolest  cohort oh yes what is that scott this is how   we clean and sanitize everything with kovid it's  basically a clorox gun yep smells like bleach

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Hello everyone and thank you for joining me for the 2020 Virtual Graduate Professional School Fair panel "From Admissions to Career Opportunities in Clinical Psychology." I am Dr. Natasha Lugo Escobar and I'm the Director of the High School Scientific Training and Enrichment Program, or Hi-STEP 2.0, in the Office of Intramural Training and Education at the National Institutes of Health, and I'm here joined today by Dr. Laura Kwako, Health Sciences Administrator at the Division of Treatment and Recovery Research at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and a credentialed Clinician-Psychologist in the Clinical Research Center at the National Institutes of Health. We also have Dr. Andres De Los Reyes, Professor of Psychology, Director of the Comprehensive Assessment and Intervention Program in the Department of Psychology at the University of Maryland College Park and Dr. Valeria Martinez-Kaigi, the Health Psychologist and an Associate Research Scientist in the Department of Psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine. So I want to thank all of you for joining us today to share a little bit about yourself, about career opportunities in the field, and just to give some insights into the application process as well for students who are interested in clinical psychology programs. So to get started, why don't each of you give me a short 2 or 3 minute introduction on what you're doing right now, your current position and role, and I'm gonna start with Laura. Thank You Natasha for the introduction, so I'm Laura Kwako, I'm a Health Scientist Administrator and Program Officer in the Division of Treatment and Recovery Research, NIAAA, and before that, I was a clinical research psychologist with an intramural program and then postdoctoral fellow. So I took a sort of research and clinical path to get here, but what I do now is scientific program administration. So that means that I am responsible for a portfolio of research grants that are funded by the NIH. I am responsible for meeting and answering with grantees and potential grantees sort of at all stages of the process of when they're considering submitting a grant application to the NIH. I'm available to answer questions and provide feedback to them through the review process, and then once grants are funded, it's my responsibility to work with my grantees to make sure that their questions are answered, to keep an eye on their research progress and also, importantly, to make sure that we're a good steward of federal funding. So you know, all NIH grants are funded by the federal government. They can be quite large and we want to make sure that our money is being spent wisely. So it's really a balance of working with scientists, but then also sort of an administrative capacity around research funding. Another part of what I do and which is a lot of fun is help write funding opportunity announcements that could be related mostly to alcohol health services topics but others as well, and in this time, we're doing a lot of funding opportunities related to the Covid-19 pandemic. So I help identify major scientific questions in the field, gaps in the research, and then draft these and help have them submitted so that scientists can then apply to these funding opportunities. So it's a really interesting diverse role. I've been in it for about a year, but it's a lot of fun for me as a clinical psychologist to use my knowledge in this capacity to help others. Interesting, thank you for sharing that. Andy? So I've been at the University of Maryland College Park for about 12 years. I run a laboratory that's tasked with improving our understanding of child and adolescent mental health with a particular emphasis on assessing and understanding social anxiety in adolescents and their family environments because many aspects of their family environments might pose risks for not only developing anxiety, but maintaining it over time. I'm embedded in a psychology department, so my salary is drawn from work in a variety of different kinds of spheres. So I do research but I also teach, and most of my my teaching focus is on introductory courses in clinical psychology that I delivered to juniors and seniors on campus, and then at the graduate level I teach courses in assessment because most of my expertise is drawn from that and among those grad courses, they're all focused on the students enrolled in our doctoral program. And then faculty in our department also dedicate a considerable amount of time service. Service to the day-to-day operations of the department itself, of the campus, of the college that we're embedded in. And then also external, we have natural partners outside of the university, so partners in philanthropy, in government, in advocacy, and so a lot of us spend a considerable amount of time engaging in service roles outside. So in much of my outside work I added a journal, The Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, I've been the editor there since 2017 and as part of that work, I do a considerable amount of professional development work focused on trying to give advice to undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, early career faculty on a host of different aspects of scientific work, including submitting applications to some of Laura's funny announcements and publishing, working in the peer review process, job interviewing, things like that, so all the different parts of what people call the hidden curriculum, the kind of things that grad students don't tend to take classes in but still need advice in order to move on to the next chapter of their careers following their training. Thank you. That's awesome. Valeria? Hi Natasha, thank you for having me. So I am a Clinical Health Psychologist. My work focuses on working on interdisciplinary teams conducting clinical trials aimed at identifying biomarkers related to state dependent treatment response, for example. I provide psychological, neuropsychological diagnostic assessments and right now I'm at the Yale School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry, and I'm housed at the Yale Stress Center and so, here at the Yale Stress Center, I conduct behavioral interventions within clinical trials aimed at developing prevention and treatment approaches that address harmful impacts of stress on psychological and physical health. Within the center, I basically have provision of clinical and preventative services for clinical research at the center. I track clinical outcomes. I supervise research staff, training them on implementing the different research assessments, conduct clinical interviews, provide psychotherapy for patients enrolled in trials, prepare manuscripts. So definitely wear a lot of hats in my role at the Yale Stress Center. I also am very involved within the American Psychological Association, so within the Society for Health Psychology, I'm the editor of the Health Psychologist, which is an online publication where we communicate on what psychologists do, what their role is and how we work within the interdisciplinary teams and using the biopsychosocial model of medicine to practice. Thank you, so interesting hearing all your jobs and current roles. So let's say for someone who is not exactly sure what a career in clinical psychology entails, and you all have, right, different roles how would you describe what it is, very shortly, and along those lines, why did you become interested in this field and doing what you're doing now? So I had a weird track moving into in clinical psychology. All throughout my childhood and up until my third year in college I wanted to be a lawyer so my aunt tells me I was pre-law since I was 4. And then I got to the summer before my senior year, I took an internship at an office that was tasked with helping people submit restraining orders in the local courthouse in downtown, Miami, and as part of that work I shadowed prosecutors who were tasked with various kinds of cases in the Criminal Division, and I, you know, it just didn't take long from observing those experiences to realize this is probably not the the line of working that I should dedicate my life to. But what I did notice when I was helping people with this particularly stressful part of their lives I kept on thinking to myself, they must be really stressed out, you know, having to go to the government to petition for protection. I wish I knew what I could say or do to help them, and since my mind kept on going there, I kept on saying myself maybe psychology is something I should look into, and then it kind of flowed, it kind of flowed from there. At first I thought, I think the way a lot of clinical psychologists think. You know, people want to go into that program, get my PhD, hang a shingle, start a practice. And then I saw what my adviser in undergrad did, Wendy Silverman, who is now at Yale, but at the time was at Florida International University and she got paid to think all day. Where do I sign up for that? That's the part that I enjoy about the job the most. You know, whether you're tasked with doing work in the grant funding space or advocacy space or policy space or research space or education or pedagogical space, you're just getting paid to think. It's just a question of where you're allocating your thoughts. Thank you. Yeah, I had a similar, I think, path where I spent my undergrad, I thought I wanted to be a sports broadcaster actually, so I pursued communication and journalism and still retained that major and just added psychology. It was just by chance that my work-study was in the Department of Psychiatry, and I was tasked with photocopying journal articles for the psychiatrist, and after hundreds of copies I started to read these articles and just became super fascinated and started to take more neuroscience coursework and added on another major and then found myself a scholar within the sciences and was accepted into a national honors program with the National Institutes of Health. And so, which brought me to do summer research at NIH, and that's what really just started my fascination with research and working in behavioral medicine and you know, so I think really being open to what you like to do and then what really becomes your passion and willing to kind of hone in on that niche. I also didn't start out as a psychology major. I was in an interdisciplinary program that included some coursework in psychology but also education and cognitive science and development and did educational research after graduate school and thought that's what I wanted to do, and a lot of the work I was doing at the time was interviewing teachers and students and I sort of realized that I enjoyed doing that and sort of really enjoyed that role of listening to them. My mother is a psychiatric social worker, and so I knew a bit about sort of the field generally. But I feel very fortunate that when I thought about clinical psychology as a discipline, it ended up working out, and I was lucky in many ways to get in, I think, and lucky that it was such a good fit. But it's a really wonderfully diverse field in many ways in terms of the coursework that's offered but also the opportunities that are offered, and there are just so many different things that clinical psychologists can do, certainly that I've done with my career. I've worked, I did an internship in a college counseling center and then I worked at a forensic state psychiatric hospital, which was very different. I've done research at the NIH and seen patients there and now in more of a scientific administration role. So, I think there's just so many different things that people can do with with a career but it's really for many of us, and for me, driven by a passion to help people, and I think that's what really stands out. Awesome, it's really interesting how, you know, your previous path kind of drive you into what you're doing right now and sometimes it's like serendipity right? You don't even, like think about it. So what in your experience what would you say are some types of experiences or training that you need to have to be able to do the job that you're doing and what would you say are the most valuable skills in this field to be successful? I think it probably depends a lot on what you're doing. I mean, as you've heard, all of us are doing very different things, and then there are clinical psychologists who are primarily focused on clinical practice, and I think to some extent those skills will vary, but I think they're all unified by being a good listener, being thoughtful, being open-minded, really being dedicated to research and science, but also clinical work and also a desire to help individuals who are suffering. That's advice that I've given research assistants over the years is that individuals interested in clinical psychology should really have a passion for both, both research and then the clinical side as well. Yeah. I definitely agree with Laura. You know, our clinical work informs our research, right? It helps us to think critically, to write the grants that are funded by NIH. What are our patients needing? That's where our curiosity needs to lie. I did several internships at NIH. One of them during my master's degree was at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and I worked with a neurologist there who's pretty famous in his field, Dr. Hallett who does movement disorder work and you know, he would do the chart scrub and he would know what the patient was coming in for, but he would sit down with the patient and he would look him right in the eye and he would say, What can I help you with? What's bothering you? What do you need? Versus reading the chart, already having in your mind well, this person is gonna need this I need to help them with this but that might not be what they need. And so, really listening like Laura said to, you know, what they need and letting some of the limitations of knowledge that we have in our clinical work inform our research to further that knowledge. I think both Laura and Valaria touch on a couple of really important things, you know, one of them is that it's less really about the kinds of experiences you'll list on your CV and more about the tools and the processes that you'll become experienced within those different kinds of places. So, active listening, being able to synthesize information, you know, take different pieces from different places and finding the force for all those different kinds of trees. Critical thinking, so getting a lot of practice. Having an idea and then testing whether or not it's an accurate reflection of the world or whatever you're trying to understand. All those different kinds of skills and experiences you can get in a lot of different places. But, you know, one place you might consider thinking about in terms of the strategy for figuring out which specific kinds of experiences you might get is by looking at current grad students that are embedded in the kinds of programs you might want to apply to, taking a look at their CVs and asking the question, what were they doing beforehand? That doesn't necessarily mean you do exactly what they do, but it might give you an indication of the kinds of things that tend to be embedded in the track records of the students that are embedded in the programs that you aspire to be admitted to. That's great advice. Thank you for sharing that. So you all have different roles, like research, teaching, funding. So, besides what you're doing right now what are some other career opportunities or paths that someone who is thinking of working in this field can pursue if, you know, you can think about a couple of others? I know Laura you say like, there's a lot of interesting things that you can do, right? So, what are some of those things that they can pursue? So there are lots of different types of programs around the nation that could prepare you for graduate school. It all kind of depends on where you think you need some extra preparation. So, it might be improving your grade. So you apply for a postbac at Georgetown and retake some courses. It could be getting more research experience. So you apply to a postbac program at NIH or a post graduate associate program at Yale and you get the things that you need. You might have graduated college a little early and you might just need some more life experience and you just want to kind of, you know, explore what you want to do. You know, you could pursue a master's degree in kind of an all-encompassing field. That's what I did. I pursued a master's degree in psychomotor kinesiology and physiology and also studied nutrition science, and I knew that was kind of a plethora of things and I could go into an MD or PhD and I was just trying to figure out, you know, what exactly do I want to do? So really exploring where you want to improve, where you want to explore, where you want to refine, and then seek out those opportunities that will help you. One of the things I love the most about this discipline is you have a lot of colleagues who take very different paths and you wind up seeing all the different ways in which a degree in psychology, and this goes for clinical psychology, but also other sub-disciplines as well, can work for you in a variety different ways. So I have colleagues of mine who have made careers in the policy arena so that can be embedded in the government, could be embedded in nonprofits for which their core mission is to advocate on specific kinds of topics or things like that. I have colleagues of mine who are in consulting so they took their training in clinical psychology which, you know, might have involved understanding how to work with clients and conduct research and a lot of those different kinds of skills, generalized, be giving people advice in a variety of different kinds of settings, you know, like in the workplace. Still other colleagues of mine who spent a sizable chunk of their career spend their time in a lot of the ways that I do now and they transitioned over into the nonprofit sector, and depending on the kind of philanthropic organization you're embedded in, you're doing some of the same things you might done before but many different things as well, they're just applied in different kinds of circumstances. They're really diverse. It's a really diverse discipline, and it opened, if you play your cards right, you can open doors in a lot of places you might not have always expected to open. Yeah, I would agree. I mean, there's just so many different paths to this field and also paths within this field as Valeria and Andres have said. Certainly the working primarily in the clinical domain with patients is another very common option, and that has so many different varieties, so many different settings, so you can work in an inpatient setting, community and mental health, private practice, work sort of embedded within a larger health maintenance organization alongside primary care providers, you can work with children, adults, adolescents, families, older individuals. You could provide psychotherapy in different formats, conduct assessment, again in different settings, work in forensic settings, so primarily within the legal system. You know many patients need representation and assistance from psychologists there. So there's just so many different things that you can do, and I think one of the things that I really appreciate as well is that flexibility even once you become a psychologist. There are different ways to make a career change, and there are ways to sort of scale up or down in one's career as you might progress. That's not to say that doesn't require a lot of additional work certainly, you know, but many psychologists, for example, I know who are in government, whether it's in a scientific administration role or policy or research, they may have a small clinical private practice on the side. And that way they're able to kind of maintain their clinical skills and still engage in other work, or they may write books or you know keep their hand in research in a different way. So there are a lot of different ways to apply the skills and the knowledge that you learn and to keep those things fresh throughout your career. Thank you. That's great to know that they have a lot of options within this discipline, it's just a matter of finding programs that expose you, prepare you for that and talking to people like you, like have very deep, like different career paths to kind of figure out what they want to do. So thank you for sharing that and for, you know, just talking a little bit about your careers and opportunities in these disciplines. So now changing gears a little bit to the application process. What would you say just, you know, in general what makes a competitive candidate who is applying for psychology programs? What are those things that the admissions committees are looking for? I think that the kind of characteristics that programs look for in applicants varies considerably depending on the kind of program you're applying to. So the ones that I'm most familiar with are doctoral programs in the discipline where you're applying with the understanding that that you're going to be working with a particular person on faculty there for a considerable amount of time. So a mentor to those kinds of programs. You know, all, in some respects, in those kinds of programs, you're not really applying to the program itself. You're applying to the mentor or mentors if there's a culture in that program that encourages people to work with more than one person. You know, in those kinds of circumstances it's important to get a sense of where you might fit in with that mentor's environment, that learning environment. Some mentors really take student that appear pretty clear that they want to study things that look very similar to what the mentor wants to study. Other mentors, particularly those who are later on in their career, are quite open to taking students who are interested in all kinds of things. In some respects you can think of them almost like galaxies unto themselves, these mentors, and each galaxy varies considerably as to where they allow their student's work to reside. But most broadly, I would say regardless of the different kinds of programs that you're considering applying to, thinking about how you can take all of your experiences, all the different things you have on your record and pulling apart the core elements of that, synthesizing the information. Essentially what you're doing in that application is you're telling the story of you. What led you to the point where you think it's a good idea to spend six years or seven years or eight years of your time, you know, in doctoral training? And that's not just listing your CV. That's trying to figure out where the core elements are, to sort of give people an idea about why you're doing what you're doing now. Yeah, and I think to piggyback off of that is, you know, it is a good five, six, even seven years sometimes that people spend in a graduate program. And it is competitive right? It's more competitive in med school just because of the numbers, right? Med schools take 100 students per year and PhD classes are five, you know, so it's just by numbers, it's just more competitive. But really finding what's going to work for you as an individual, and think holistically, right? What's going to work for you in terms of your emotional health or psychological health? Can you be far from your family? Can you not be? What's really, because it's a lot. It's very demanding. So what does your personal life look like? Do you really want to focus on research or do you want to mentor that maybe focuses more on clinical work? You know, really look for what's going to make you happy for those six years. There are many many good clinical psych programs around the nation, and those programs don't always, are not always associated with the big name schools. So really focus on what, you know, not so much on the fancy name of the school but the actual program, what you're going to get in the program, and how that's going to affect the trajectory of your career. And I would agree and echo everything that both Andy and Valeria said. I mean, there are a lot of variables to consider and you really do need to think holistically about what's going to be the best fit for you and with a given program, with the mentor, with the environment of the program, the broader context in which it's situated, location opportunities for additional training, all kinds of things. But I think for applicants too, some of the other things that they may think about in crafting a competitive application are things like having poster presentations, potentially being an author on a publication, and not necessarily a first author but if there's a way to contribute meaningfully, that's always, typically always helpful. Some sort of clinical interest or experience, understanding the limitations of what individuals that, you know, earlier in their careers can do, but it could potentially be work in crisis hotlines, whether that's by telephone or video or text, volunteering with children or adults, and obviously that's challenging right now to do in person but there are a lot of different forms that that can take. That's often very helpful. But I agree too with Andy's point about really sort of distilling down what's the essence of what makes you interested in this field and what makes you a strong fit for a given program and potentially with a given mentor. So really being clear about that with yourself so that you can then convey it clearly to the program in your application materials. Thank you for sharing all those useful tips and from your experience. So you touch a little bit on, you know, application, but in general, what would you say is different, makes a PhD in clinical psychology different from other PhD programs, and if you can touch a little bit about, you know, maybe concerns a student might have in terms of like requirements for application, in terms of GRE, and then, we talked about, right, that depending on the school that they want to go, they might have to select a mentor first or later. So what would you recommend them to do this the best way, to find these mentors and also thinking about schools when they start this process, if you just can comment a little bit on all these things that you think are important for them. Well, one of the things to me that really distinguishes the clinical psychology and associated PhD programs is the clinical training component. So while you're doing coursework and research in the same way that you're doing any PhD program, there's also a clinical training aspect, and that may begin in your first or second year that you are closely supervised in individual and group settings. You receive feedback about your interactions with clients. You know, you may be working in settings that are extremely challenging, and it's really, it really can be a uniquely difficult time personally. It's often a time of tremendous personal growth as well, but I think this goes back to Valeria's point about taking care of yourself and really knowing what you will need to thrive in these programs because it's not easy learning to do clinical work with patients, whether that's psychotherapy or assessment. And so really knowing that you will need a good deal of support in doing that I think is important and really what distinguishes clinical psychology programs from other disciplines. And Natasha, I know you had a lot of other questions about sort of application and what makes a competitive application and GRE scores and how people might find mentors and things like that. I'll just very briefly, I think it really depends on the program and so I think it's critically important that whatever programs students are interested in, and there's a great book called The Insiders Guide to Graduate Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology, that is a really wonderful resource that is one way of helping identify programs. But also networking with professors from undergraduate if you're in a current research position, reaching out to people whose publications you're interested in if you have a specific question to them can all be ways to find potential mentors that you're interested in and also find potential programs that might be a good fit for you. Just to piggyback off of that, definitely the clinical highlight is the distinguished factor between, you know, a psychology degree, a doctorate degree in psychology versus clinical psychology, and you wear many many hats so, you know, throughout the day. So in the morning you might go to your course, do your coursework and the afternoon you're seeing two or three patients in the clinic, and in the late afternoon through the evening you're conducting research. And so, maybe you even taught a class that day. So you're wearing many hats as a student in clinical psychology, which is really difficult, and at the same time it's worth it because all of those skills are going to really transfer, and the great thing about a degree in clinical psychology is it's so versatile and you can go in and out of things throughout your whole career, and Andres and Laura and I already touched on that. They have, you know, colleagues, all of us do different things. You mentioned colleagues that do different things, and you can even do different things in different chapters of your career. You know, you might spend the first five, ten years doing X, Y, and Z and then think ah, no I don't want to do that anymore I want to go and work on Capitol Hill or I want to have my own practice or I want to write a book. You know, you can do all of these things. I think that's the great thing about clinical psychology, and because of what Andres does in his field, I'll let him touch on more of like the GRE application process and that, but in terms of mentorship, I wanted to conduct my dissertation at the National Institutes of Health, and the NIH has a program called the Graduate Partnerships Program, and it's a unique program that is internationally known where PhD students can apply for this fellowship to conduct their dissertation on campus and kind of go back and forth between their campus and NIH to conduct their research. So with this in mind, I wanted to find a mentor in a program who really was more clinical and didn't really have a robust lab so that I can go to NIH and conduct my research. And so that was kind of my primary goal when I was looking for a research program. The other way students have done it is to find two kind of rock star researchers within their particular research interest field and say hey, do you want to do research with the scientists at NIH and then you kind of are the middleman between these two principal investigators collaborating on a project that becomes your dissertation. So that's a unique way to do things, but I wanted to let you guys know that NIH has this fantastic program where you could really become really well-versed in research and your clinical work. One of the things that I like about clinical psychology, and then this is true of a lot of different disciplines, is how interconnected the work is. And so you have all these different people studying sometimes very similar things and you know, each of them are producing work that gives other people ideas for new work. And so when students are thinking about, when students ask me for advice about how to look for mentors, one of the places where I say they might start is to start looking at the tables of contents of journals that publish work they find interesting, and over time, if you do that for a period of weeks, tables of contents followed by abstracts followed by, among the ones you seem really interested in reading the whole article, you'll start noticing patterns with doing that for a few weeks. The kind of topics you gravitate towards, the kinds of people who do work in those areas, and in this respect, it's kind of like an organic way of finding those people who could potentially mentor you because the authors of the articles will also often happen to be affiliated with doctoral programs you'd eventually apply to. And I also agreed that there are a variety of other ways you can do it as well. I know that's not the approach I took when I applied to grad school. I asked my undergrad advisor, you know, who do you respect? Who does work in your area? And I'll look at what they do. And since she gave me a list of all these great people, and my mentor was eventually on the list that she originally gave me. And then in terms of the application process and different components in them, you know, you'll notice in a lot of these programs, they'll ask you obviously for your transcripts and letters of recommendation and things like that, and they might also even ask you for your test records like for the Graduate Record Examination, the GRE. Now you might be noticing if you follow Twitter, there's a hashtag now called #grexit, G-R-E- X-I-T. And there are a lot of programs where the GRE requirements are in flux. So I encourage you to, anybody is applying now, to take a look at what the current updates are with programs as to whether or not they are even asking applicants to submit these records. Some grad programs, because of the Covid-9 pandemic, are having them be optional. Other programs are saying we'll not only do it optional this year, we're going to drop it entirely. So, you know, I would encourage you to stay current as to what the different programs you're considering are asking of you, because it may save you some money and time. Yeah, definitely. I wanted to mentioned one other way. The American Psychological Association has, I believe, 54 divisions and these are all divisions within psychology. And so if you go to the APA and you look up divisions, you can find different specialties within psychology, and you can look at those leaders and all these leaders are in various universities around the nation, and you could, some of these programs, some of these divisions have their websites that even have lists of graduate schools that focus on their particular specialty. I'm involved in division 38, which is health psychology. You know, we have resources for students that are looking into going to grad school where they could find specific mentors, and so there's a lot of these resources might just already at the tips of your finger, you just kind of go do a little digging, and the APA is a perfect place to start. Thank you for sharing that, that's awesome for them to know. And just a question in terms of, you know, differences with other programs. So what would you say for some students who are a little bit confused about what is a PhD in psychology versus clinical psychology, and then a PhD in clinical psychology versus a PsyD, and for some, is a master's necessary? So can you comment quickly on these aspects just to clarify that for those who have questions regarding that? So I'll quickly, I'll give my program that I graduated from as a quick example. So, I went to the University of North Texas, and within that program they had several APA accredited programs, and even within the program they had, like, specialties. So for example, there was general clinical psychology that was accredited. Then, they had the program that I graduated from which is health psychology and behavioral medicine. And then they had also a counseling psychology program, and within that program you could specialize in Marriage and Family Therapy or you could specialize in Sport Psychology, which they have one of the best programs in the nation, and all of these programs are APA accredited. So, you know, it's important to kind of look and see what your interests are and where these programs lie and what this particular specialty might do for you. So in some counseling psychology programs, they might act similar to a general clinical psychology program where you could really have a plethora of opportunities to work, you know, academic medical centers, but some counseling psychology programs are really focused on focusing on marriage and family therapy. So you moreso work in small private practices or even housed within like a Student Health Center on campus. So I think really trying to figure out what those programs entail and where some of these people are moving their career forward. When you go to the websites of some of the graduate programs, a lot of times they'll have listed, where are their graduates now? Where are they working? What are they doing? And so that's a really good way to kind of distinguish, okay, well this counseling APA accredited program has most of their individuals working in academic medical centers. In this particular program, most people are working in private practice. So, you know, these types of specialties can be versatile, but it's good to see what the programs are producing and where people are going. So, when thinking about the distinction between say clinical psychology and another sub-discipline of psychology like cognitive or social or behavioral neuroscience, you know, a lot of times the distinction can be just as broad as basic versus applied. So, the people in the other sub-disciplines might be mainly interested in careers focused on basic science, whether it's in an academic setting or in a non- academic setting like in policy or things like that. And then, you know, you can distinguish those kinds of programs from other programs that are within the realm, in the more applied realm, what APA will call a Health Service Program, so that includes clinical but it also includes counseling psychology, which might touch on a lot of the same kinds of issues that folks trained in clinical psychology might with some caveats. So, the biggest historical distinction between say counseling and clinical is that scholars in the counseling space have traditionally focused more of their attention on the process of therapy. How do you work with clients? How do clients change over time? How do you change over time when you're delivering services? Or as, you know, a clinical psychologist, although they might very well be interested and appreciate the therapeutic process, will often dedicate their time to understanding the techniques, the actual things that the actual programs delivered in there. Now, those are historical distinctions. They've faded over time, and now you can see a lot of clinical psychologists whose work has a look and feel of a counseling psychologist and vice versa. And still another one are those in school psychology programs where when the training looks a lot like it might look with counseling psychology or clinical psychology with the one caveat that the thinking along service delivery and research is focused on how mental health concerns manifest in the school system and related spaces. You know, a lot of variability among, but what I'll say is that a lot of people who got their training in each of those will wind up having careers that look very similar to others, or very different. It's a lot of variability in there. Yeah, I agree there really is a lot of variability and a lot of different paths to potentially the same careers, but also similarly, folks in the same program can end up in a lot of different places, so it really just depends. So the question about a master's degree being necessary to apply to doctoral programs. They're not necessary. If you have one, you can certainly still apply. If you don't have one you can apply. It really just depends on the program. But also to the distinction between clinical psychology PhD versus PsyD programs, you know, certainly I would encourage folks to look at the actual curriculum requirements, look at statistics around internship application and acceptance, time to graduation, things like that. Traditionally, PsyD programs have been focused more on the professional practice of psychology and less on the research, although again, there's a lot of variability there, depending on the program. There are also more likely to be sort of independent schools of professional psychology rather than necessarily housed within a larger university. But again, there's variability there. I do think it is important for students, kind of no matter what discipline or sub-discipline of psychology you're looking at, is to consider things like funding sources for graduate school. What is your debt burden expected to look like if you're not funding it yourself or if you didn't have a scholarship or come in on a fellowship? That's really critically important and it's not something that's often discussed on the webpages of graduate programs, but it's something that students should be thinking about. I mean, this is a really long time commitment. Potentially, it's a substantial financial commitment as well, and while psychology has many wondrous things about it as a career, it's not necessarily the most lucrative. So it is something to think about in terms of how much debt are you willing to take on for this career? What would it look like to pay that back? And there are lots of different ways to, you know, pay that debt back. But it is an important practical consideration that I think, you know, no matter what program you're looking at, that's something that you should be thinking about. Thank you, all great advice, and I mean, we have maybe about eight minutes left so just in the current situation, right, many, we know that many internships and many experiences were canceled. Do you have any ideas of what students can do now to kind of fill this gap and keep building on their resume in terms of experiences that can help them throughout this time? Well, so one of the trends that we're seeing a lot right now is an increased use of telehealth, whether that's by video or phone, a lot of research grants are moving towards that. Clinical services certainly are moving towards that, and the good news is that potentially, individuals interested in careers in clinical psychology could still participate in some of those services. So I mentioned crisis hotlines earlier, whether by text or phone. Those are still options, and we're also seeing a really, an increased demand for those kinds of services because of the really unprecedented stress and the effects that we're seeing from the Covid-19 pandemic. This is also potentially a great time to do writing, whether it's on paper. There are still, I know, many conferences that are being hosted virtually and they're offering virtual poster presentations. They're offering sort of virtual networking hours. So, you know, in my experience from working with my grantees and just generally within the field is that folks really understand that this time is unprecedented, that we're all doing our best and they're really applying as much flexibility as possible. They want to help students, you know, they know students are in a really challenging position and applicants are in a really challenging position, so they're willing to work with individuals to provide as much flexibility as possible so that this time can be used productively while also taking care of themselves in their health. And also I think, reach out to your current mentors. If you're in the process of applying to graduate school, it's likely that you're a scholar, you're well-connected within your program, and you might already be doing research with some of the professors. And reach out to your mentors and ask, you know, what's going on in your lab right now? Is there anything that I can do to help? Especially during a pandemic, right? This is a very unique opportunity to train during the pandemic and whatever your mentors are doing, just reach out and say can I be involved in some way? Can I help, you know, really with anything? And I think that would be really helpful and unique to put on your graduate school application. It might surprise you what opportunities are available in, even in labs that you haven't been necessarily connected to, you know. So a lot of these labs, because of the pandemic, have taken a right turn or a 180 degree turn or a completely different turn and started working on things that they wouldn't have anticipated working on had the pandemic never occurred, and a lot of times, as Laura mentioned, because that work is happening in the virtual space, that frees open the kinds of people embedded in different kinds of locations in the US or even outside of the US who might very well be able to help. Our own lab is putting together a project in the virtual space, and you know, although we are relying mainly on volunteers who were already working with us beforehand or are already embedded on campus, you know, so long as people have the requisite training, the requisite, you know, online human subjects training and things like that, I mean, the doors are fairly open. for people interested in working with labs that otherwise they might not have been able to get to work with because of geographic constraints. Thank you. I think these are really great suggestions, and kind of like ease their stress and think about and plan what they can do now in these unprecedented times. Just to, now to wrap up as we come at the end of our session, knowing what you know now, what advice would you give to someone who is considering a career in clinical psychology? I think being able to get some life experience I think could be really valuable going into a clinical psychology program. It's very demanding, and you potentially graduate right out of undergrad and go straight into a PhD and that's fine, and you might excel and do extremely well. But you know, you do work with people. Clinical psychologists are experts in human behavior, and, you know, getting some more life experience under your belt might help with just appreciating the content and the knowledge that you're learning and applying it a little bit more. Our brains don't fully develop until we're 26, right, our frontal lobes. So you still have some time to continue to develop and make decisions. And so, you know, if you want to pursue a master's degree just to explore a different topic or, you know, travel, anything, work as a postbac somewhere conducting research, anything you can do to kind of get life experience I think will help you in a clinical psychology program to try to understand what specialty you do want to focus in and where you really want your career to go. Thank you Valeria. You know, I wish the earlier version of me knew how important it was to be a great storyteller. So we were talking before about synthesizing information and conveying information clearly to people. And any of us who have ever sat in a talk where the speaker was just giving us facts facts facts facts, it's really easy for our brain to turn off when you get that kind of monotony. Our brains respond to patterns, and the best patterns are stories. About five years ago, I read a book that I encourage anyone to read as early in their development as they possibly can. It's Randy Olson's, "Houston, We Have a Narrative," and it provides scientists concrete tools for how to overlay narrative structure on their work. It's a brilliant piece of work, and in getting practice learning how to tell stories, it has fundamentally changed everything that I do, the way I write papers, the way I write grants, the way I teach, the way I write emails, the way I ride the elevator and I pitch an idea to a colleague of mine. That's part and parcel of what it is to communicate usually really complex information to people who don't have the privilege of your expertise. And that's how, you know, we speak to audiences. I encourage you to learn about storytelling as soon as you possibly can. Thank you, Andy. Those are both such great answers, and I agree with both of them. I think certainly having life experience is critical, and not being afraid to take some time off before you apply to graduate school even if it feels like I can't take another year off. You quite possibly can and that might really really make you very clear about why you want to pursue a career in clinical psychology or not. You may decide otherwise and that's fine, too. I think if I could look back and give advice, I would say it's to really keep the big picture perspective in mind and to think flexibly. You know, we've talked, all three of us have talked about what a versatile degree this is and how many different paths it can take us on, and I think really appreciating that and being curious and exploring how this foundation in this training clinical psychology could prepare you for a number of different careers and really don't be afraid to take risks and to be creative with what you might want to do, whether that's writing a book or designing a course or starting your own private practice or pursuing a research career or joining government and really focusing on policy. There's so many different things that you can do and so many different ways that you can use this degree to help people. So I would really just encourage you to be curious and to look at all the different options that you could take. Thank you, this is great advice, and I want to thank you all for joining me here this morning to talk about your career and about the field and, you know, just being willing to answer all our questions. Hopefully, next year we'll see you in person at the Grad School and Professional School Fair at the NIH, but as of now, I just wanna say thank you all for joining me. Thank you, thank you bye. Thank you Natasha.

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hi everyone my name's dylan and i'm a second year student studying a bachelor of psychology honours and a bachelor of laws i'm joined today by the director of undergraduate studies for psychology dr elizabeth thank you so much for joining us my pleasure uh so we've got a few questions to ask you about uh commonly held sort of queries and and things that people want to know heading into psychology so uh to start off i guess what is psychology is it reading people's minds or is there more to it than that there's definitely more to it than that so the proper definition of psychology is it's the scientific study of human behavior and what that means is that what we're interested in is how people behave why it is people do what they do how they think how they process information from the world how we interact with each other all the things that make people tick and make people special so certain parts of psychology are about what makes you an individual what makes you different to your friends what makes you different to your siblings or from your parents what makes you special and then other areas of psychology are about what makes everybody act similarly under certain situations so how we process information in a similar way how external influences impact us in a similar way and so some areas of psychology are about everyday experiences and everyday human behaviour other areas of psychology are maybe what a lot of people think about which is the more clinical end of mental health disorders or mental health challenges but psychology itself is a hugely wide-ranging discipline there's a heap that's involved in it so definitely more than dr phil on tv that's a very very small part of it yeah awesome cool so uh what i guess the next question would be what can i do to call myself a psychologist what does becoming a psychologist entail so there's the distinction in psychology between the discipline of psych and then a profession of a psychologist what that means is that if you actually want to practice psychology and call yourself a psychologist it's actually quite a long road to get there if you think about the important training that people need in order to practice mental health therapies and to help people with mental health challenges there's quite a lot of training involved so what that means is that you need an undergraduate degree in psychology like a bachelor of psychology which is a three-year degree then you also need an honours year or an equivalent fourth year of your studies and then some post-graduate training as well and some of that involves actual professional practical supervision so it's at least a six-year pathway to actually get to that point of being able to call yourself a psychologist yeah for sure that's so interesting and the fact that you do take so many steps to actually get there and um i guess it's so important to make sure you have that training and that expertise before you go into helping people with their mental health yeah it's really important absolutely awesome so uh the next question would be you talked about a bachelor of psychology and also honours so what is a bachelor of psychology and how does that compare to a bachelor of psychology with honors so there's those are two different degrees that students can enroll in the bachelor of psychology is a three-year undergraduate degree the bachelor of psychology honours is a four-year undergraduate degree which is those first stay in three years plus an honours year which is the fourth year and the difference between those two degrees in terms of the first two years of study is basically nothing in terms of the cycle that students study so the psychology part of the first two years of the degree is identical between the two there's a little bit of a difference at third year for the students who are doing the honours track and then the main difference is actual fourth year which is the honours year and what students do in that fourth year is they they undertake an empirical thesis and what that means is that they get to conduct their own research study they get to design a study carry it out test some very cool things on some participants and write it up into this very impressive thesis and they also do some coursework as well so that's the fourth year but the track to get to honours is identical and then for those first couple of years between the two um different degrees and it's really important that even if you don't get into an honours degree straight off you can also transfer from the b psych to the base icons when you undertaking your degree and that's a very common thing for our students to do so the other thing that's really important for students to know about psychology honours is that even if you're in this honours degree it's important that you need to meet the entry requirements get into the honours year that fourth year and that just means performing at a certain level across your psychology studies but the good thing about that is that all students who meet that entry requirement get into honours so we don't have any caps now honest places at macquarie every student who gets the entry requirements will get into an honors we'll get an honest place and that's so special because it means that everyone's working towards a common goal and it really facilitates collaboration and working collectively rather than having some sort of like competitive trying to fight against each other together yeah exactly and that's a big thing that we notice among our students is that they really like working together because everyone's trying to achieve the same goal which is great absolutely fantastic cool so uh let's say i'm interested in psych but i'm not sure if i want to become a psychologist what options are there out there for me if i just do the three-year degree yep so it's really common for our students to take psychology at undergraduate to be really interested in it but not necessarily want to go on to the kind of quite long pathway to become a psychologist and the good news is that there's heaps of different jobs that are training in psychology and undergraduate training in psychology helps you get prepared for so because psychology is all about understanding people that makes you very well suited for any kind of job that you might undertake so understanding what makes people tick what makes people work well together understanding kind of management of people all of those kinds of things are very appropriate for working in business or working in human resource management areas like that so there's also a really strong emphasis on critical thinking on evaluating information from the world not just believing things that you're told because somebody tells you but actually thinking independently for yourself so other jobs that some of our graduates go on to is in social research or market research it could be in community work or case management it could be working in organizations it could be working in policy there's a heap of different job opportunities available for students outside psychology that's so cool that's awesome there's so many things available from one single degree that you do absolutely awesome so i guess the next thing i want to know is what makes psychology at macquarie special so my mind's kind of a biased perspective but i think macquarie offers a really great psych program one of the things that makes us really special is one of our subjects that third year has a practical placement element and what that gives students is the opportunity to actually see what it's like to work in a psychology related discipline and a lot of our students get a hands-on experience at these jobs that they might actually end up going into once they finish their degree so that means that students can work in psychology or work in community work work in counseling there's a heap of different opportunities available to students and it's their really first strong taste of what it's actually like to work in outside world outside of their uni studies so that's a really great subject we also have a heap of different psych electives that students can take so throughout your psych degree there's some core subjects that all students need to take there's also quite a range of different options available to you that's other psych topics that you can take if you're really interested in say health psychology organizational psychology the psychology of music or counseling so there's a really wide range of electives that we offer and we also have a lot of very passionate teaching staff that teach in our degrees who are absolutely passionate about psychology so you get a great experience at macquarie and i think that passion and that real life applicability is so special like the fact that you're able to be in the classroom doing your degree but have such a career-based focus and how you can actually use your degree after you graduate it's such an awesome thing so that's very very cool for sure we spend a lot of time trying to make that the best experience for our students as possible so cool i love it so the last question i want to know is sam solz i'm absolutely loving what you're saying and i want to come to macquarie for psychology what does that entail so in your first year what first year psych is all about is giving you an introduction to the really really broad area that is psychology and that means that in our first two introduction to psych subjects you take a little bit of different areas of psychology so you do a little bit of personality you do a little bit of social psych you do a little bit of health psych of clinical psych of organizational psych it's really there to give you a taste of what the breadth of this area is and then when you do second year you get a little bit more specialized and third you get a bit more specialized after that that's awesome and the fact that you're able to sort of narrow in see everything that's available and then choose what you like that sounds very very cool indeed and i think one of the biggest pieces of advice i always like to give students is just to enjoy it so the more you enjoy it the more engaged you are the more you realize how amazing it is and how interesting it is the more you're going to get out of it and the better you're going to do so absolutely just enjoy it for sure thank you so much for that alyssa and uh thank you all for tuning in uh that's the end of our pre-prepared questions but we want to hear from you and hear what you want to say so we'll go live now to the q a to answer the questions you have good morning thank you so much for joining us and welcome to the psychology and cognitive science studio here as part of macquarie university's open day streamed sorry we can't be with you in person today but hopefully we'll be able to answer all your questions psychology and cognitive science related over the course of the day to introduce myself my name's dylan and i'm a second year student studying a bachelor of psychology honours and a bachelor of laws here at macquarie university i'll be your host for today so i'm really excited to be able to share this day with you and go through this virtual experience what you've just seen is a pre-recorded video with the director of undergraduate studies for psychology here at macquarie dr elizabeth and we're lucky enough that she joins us live in studio today dr beath is a researcher and a lecturer here at macquarie university and her research specializes in stress and well-being in the areas of educational and health psychology what she's probably best known for on campus is her statistics memes that she includes in her lectures which are always a fun and welcome addition to mix it up a little bit from the traditional content so thank you again so much for joining us today my pleasure hi john hi how's it going welcome everyone thanks for joining us thanks for being here guys um as you can see now we're going to go into a live q a session so there's probably a q a function just here to the side of your screen we've already got some awesome questions filling in so please keep them coming and we'll answer as many as we can during this session so jumping right into the first one anne-marie says hello thank you for running this session so thank you for watching um year 12 subjects for psychology courses she wants to know if there's any prerequisites for them so is it necessary to study science subjects in year 12 or maths or physics or anything like that great question so there's nothing that you need to study in year 12 in order to get into psych there's no core prerequisites that you have to do we always recommend maths just because there is a little bit of statistics in psychology it's part of the course that i really really love because i do a lot of teaching on it so if you have a foundation of high school maths that makes you really well suited for studying in psychology but there's nothing that you absolutely have to do and while the scientific method and scientific approaches is a really big part of psychology you don't actually have to have studied any science in high school so you don't need physics or chemistry or biology in high school just an understanding of the scientific approaches and how science kind of informs our seeking of evidence and evaluation of evidence will always be great but nothing that you have to study just a good attitude i even know in the end of year 10 when i was choosing subjects for senior years i still didn't really know what i wanted to do for university so it's awesome that you don't have to study any subjects because you have that flexibility you have those options to obviously still pursue psychology and university if you haven't done the same maths or science absolutely it's definitely an awesome level of flexibility that that definitely i think high school is stressful enough to take a little bit of pressure off it to do psych i couldn't have said it by myself alrighty so we've got another question here um this one's from michael so thank you for tuning in uh he asks what can you combine with psych as a double degree there's heaps of things that you can combine with psych doubles degrees are really really popular students love studying two different degrees at once and it's a really great way of enriching and kind of extending your psychology studies some of the really common double degrees that students take are psychology with cognitive and brain sciences which you guys will learn a little bit more about throughout the day that's a really really amazingly natural combination but also studying psychology with education studying psychology with linguistics speech and hearing psychology with law which dylan knows a little bit about um business commerce those are some really common combinations but there's lots of different things that you can study together and i know studying two things so having psychology and law and studying at the same time has just completely enriched my experience of uni and i find it so interesting to study two really different things but even the ways of thinking and the critical analysis that is so important to both of them really lends itself to the other so the skills i'm learning in a psychology class i can apply it to my law classes and even have a little bit of an edge over other people who maybe aren't learning those things yeah definitely yeah that's one of the things with psych is that it kind of enriches your understanding of so many things in the world so it combines really really well with a lot of different disciplines for sure absolutely so thank you for that question we've got another one here from jessie she asks is there an eight hour requirement for the undergraduate course yep so there's a couple of different a tiles because there's a couple of different psychology degrees that we offer so the bachelor of psychology honours is around 94 the bachelor of psychology is around 80. as you guys know a tiles change from year to year so last year's 8 hours is just kind of a projection of what next years will be so the different the different courses have different atar requirements and of course we have our undergraduate course guide which tells you an indication of the 2021 uh atar cutoffs so for example if you're doing a double degree it might be a different uh atar again so you can always check that out um they're featured on our website as well so feel free to have a look at them hopefully you stay with us till the end and one of the other things that's really common is for students to not quite get the atar into the psychology honours course that they want to do and so then they can enroll in the b psych or one of the other degrees at macquarie and then do the psychology subjects and transfer throughout the degree macquarie is really flexible with our course transfer so that's always an option it's an option a lot of students take up when they're studying at macquarie so dr bate that's a really good point to touch on um i guess a really common question that people want to know is the exact difference between psychology honours and a bachelor of psychology yep so they're really common degrees particularly in the first two years the actual psychology content is identical between the b psych and the beast icons the main difference is that the honours degree is a four-year degree so that fourth year is your honours year and every student who is even those who are enrolled in the psychology honours degree still need to meet the entry requirements to get into that honours year at the end of third year and those entry requirements are having an overall average wham a weighted average mark of 70 across all of your psychology subjects across all of your psychology units and an average of 75 across your third year psychology units so all students even those that are in the psychology honours degree need to meet the entry requirements to get into honors awesome thank you for that uh we've got another question here um the question is if i don't take advanced maths as an hsc subject will i struggle in the maths component of the degree for example statistics yes definitely not so as someone that teaches the stats component of the psychology degree there are a heap of resources that we provide everybody with in order to help you if you think that maths isn't quite your strong suit the other really important thing is that it's not pure maths that we do as part of psychology it's applied statistics and that's really really different to the kind of maths that you would do at high school or the kind of math you do if you're actually studying a math degree so it's all very applied it's all about using maths and using statistics in order to answer psychology research questions and because it's that's really applied context a lot of students don't struggle with it like they would struggle with maths otherwise and hopefully the way that we sell it and the way that we teach it using things like stats memes that i absolutely love doing in my teaching is a way of understanding the the applied nature of it and therefore understanding the relevance of it so it's not quite as scary maths as it otherwise could be a lot of people think it might be going in and even things like to set up peer assisted learning study sessions to balance any ideas of other students who've done really well in the subject or even just the unpacked ideas more in a sort of class setting in a group study setting and things like the numeracy center as well which is available to all students um where it's pretty much like free math tutoring if you are having a little bit of difficulty with the maths component you can go in there talk to an expert and get the help you need so yeah i would definitely echo what you said and say that there's so much help for you um doing maths and getting on top of the maths components of psychology i was never a big math student in in high school so i know that there's still all this support and people have my back and want me to succeed and get me through those components there's a number of different support services at the university both in the psych department and also generally at the university to help anybody who's struggling through it so there's a lot of support available absolutely we've got another really good question here that says what does the syllabus syllabus look like across the four years of psych so what areas are research in each year yeah that's a great question so first year psychology we have two different subjects that students study intro to psych one and intro dislike two and the the way that these subjects are set up is that they give students a taste of all the different areas of psychology so every two weeks you cover a different topic so you cover some social psychology some personality some health psychology some learning some neuropsychology every two weeks you get a different taste and the idea with those two subjects is that they're a very broad exposure to the massive like wide ranging breadth that is the topic of psychology and then in the second year there's six different core units that you need to take so all students who are studying cyclaps take those individual units and that's social and personality psychology biopsychology and learning perception cognition design and stats and then at third year it gets a little bit more specialized again so every year that you go throughout the degree you get a little bit more specialized a little bit more in depth in terms of what it is that you study so you start off really broad first year a bit more specific the second year and then a bit more specific at third year and the other thing that's great about the psych degree is that there's a lot of electives that you can take so if you're interested in certain areas of psychology like neuropsychology like organizational psychology health psychology while you'll learn about all of those things at first year at second year and third year if you're really really interested in them you can take them as elective subjects and get even more exposure to the amazing areas of psychology the thing i love about that is especially in first year you were exposed to such a wide variety of psychological disciplines and and your eyes are really open to what is entailed in psychology rather than just thinking it's about feelings or having these sort of preconceived notions that you come into it with and as well the lectures that we get in in those two-week blocks are obviously specialized in their fields for each part of psychology and these are lecturers who have done research for many years and are sort of helping honor students through their their chosen disciplines so it's amazing to be exposed to that level of expertise and having people with that passion so early on in our psychology degrees and i think it's also nice for students to get a taste of all the different lecturers who are experts in that particular area so you can expose that just from the first year on and see who you like exactly we've got another really good question here from natalie so thank you for posting your questions guys i can see them all flooding in natalie asks what are some examples of research topics that students research during their honesty there are so many i couldn't possibly cover all of them there's a heap of different sorts of topics that students cover in their honours year so every honors student gets paid with a supervisor and when you first meet your supervisor you get to talk to them and learn about what their particular area of expertise is and most students will pick a topic pick a research topic that's in their supervisor's area of expertise so for my particular students they look at stress and appraisal and well-being i have some students that look at chronic pain individuals with chronic pain i have some students look at academic performance and stress and well-being at university i have some students who look at learning i have some students that look at positive psychology so you kind of get to talk to talk to your supervisor and learn about what it is that they do what it is that makes them tick and what it is that they're passionate about and most students will craft their research project around what it is that their supervisor is interested in and the benefit of doing that is that the supervisor is the expert there so they can best advise the students in there so it's kind of a combination of working between the student and the supervisor to pick a project that is doable is feasible in the kind of year or a little bit less than a year that you get to do it in but it's also fascinating and novel and exciting and really just amazing amazingly interesting and it's the only second year student i can't talk from experience about honesty but definitely excited to hopefully embark on that journey and have that support from people who are so good at what they do and so passionate as well yeah absolutely and it's your first exposure of actually doing your own research projects you learn a lot about research throughout your undergrad degree but actually doing your own research project crafting a research question designing a study collecting the data to answer the question doing the stats analysis yourself with support of course it's the first kind of exposure that students have to really being in control and having the ability to do it themselves which is really exciting for them absolutely thank you for that uh we've got another question here from sophia so thank you for posting your question um she asks um if you were studying a bachelor of psychology honours but don't meet the entry requirements for the fourth year um do you graduate from the first three years with with a bachelor of psychology yeah so the short answer to that is yep there's a little bit of paperwork involved in transferring from the honours degree to the three-year degree but that is a common thing a lot of students do so if you get into the honours degree or you think you might want to do honours and then you decide that you don't want to do it it's not for you or you don't meet the entry requirements then you can graduate with a three-year b psych degree or one of the other degrees depending on what it is that you've covered throughout your undergrad i guess a really good follow-up question to that would be if you do graduate without honours if you go through and do your bachelor of psychology um what would you do typically as a career after that yep so there's a heap of different careers that you can cover if you've got a psychology degree if you wanted to get into that pathway to become a psychologist then you'd need to do it a fourth year program somewhere else if you didn't do honours at macquarie but there's a heap of different jobs that students can do with the three-year site degrees they can go into human resource management or counseling community work they can go into case management or social research there's heaps of different jobs available but you need that fourth year which is the honours year in order to get that pathway to become a psychologist if you want to but you do always have the option to do your three years of uni and still have so many rewarding and amazing career options open to you so it's definitely not the end of the world by any means there's lots of different pathways and different things to different people so it's quite a flexible degree in that way in that if you want to go in the pathway you can continue on that pathway but if you don't then there's lots of other opportunities available to you thank you for that um so sophia asks hi i do a bachelor of psychology bachelor of psychology students need to undergo an interview or screening to transfer into the honors year so there's nothing that students need to do in order to get entry into the honours year other than meeting the entry requirements so it's something the assessment happens behind the scenes you guys don't need to do an interview or anything like that you need to put in application for honors but all of the assessment happens behind the scenes the application's just saying that you want to undertake honours and giving us an idea of some of the topics that you might want to cover during your honors thesis which helps us in allocating you to your individual supervisor and the really nice thing about honours at macquarie which is quite unique to macquarie is um there's no quota no no cap on the number of students that are able to undertake honors it's like at macquarie so if you're meeting the weighted average mark requirements that dr b talked about before you have that option to go into honors and complete that one as a year you're not competing against your fellow students for spots and there's not these big rivalries and this competition a bit like it might be for leading up to trials in the hsc it's really collaborative and it really promotes um group work and working together towards a collective goal rather than sort of fighting against your mates to get in absolutely and that's a really nice thing about magoris is some universities do have caps on their honors places so only a certain number of students will get allocated places here at macquarie if you get the marks get in we offer all students a place and as you said it's a really great way of trying to get students to work together and realise that they're all doing this for this common goal absolutely we've got another question here um natalie asks is honours necessary to complete your masters in psychology yeah so the short answer is yes there's a very specific pathway if you want to get into a masters of psychology and the reason for that is because psychology is accredited at the australian wide level at the nationwide level so there's a very specific pathway that you need to follow and study at a university or an institute that offers an accredited psychology program like we have here at macquarie so you need to do a fourth year of a qualification which at most universities or places is an honours year at some other institutions it's called a postgraduate diploma um which is a kind of equivalent fourth year program but yeah if you want to do a masters of clinical psychology or neuropsychology or organizational psychology any of the other master's programs that um either macquarie or other places offer you need to do that fourth year which is your honors year here and it's really good that you guys are asking questions about masters and wanting to know things about after your undergraduate psychology we actually have our postgrad studio also live streaming today and we have all the information you wouldn't want to know about postgrad psychology on at that postgrad studio at 12 o'clock yep so at 12 o'clock we'll be talking a little bit more about details about postgraduate programs postgraduate degrees so tuning in to interested in those kinds of things and we can talk about it more then and you can ask questions then too absolutely um lauren asks is it difficult to do a fourth year somewhere else if we don't meet the requirements at macquarie um it's not necessarily difficult you just need to find the right place you need to find the right other university or institute or college that will offer a standalone fourth year program so it is relatively common there are a lot of students that get into that situation that need to do that so there are lots of places that you can that you can find you just need to do a little bit of searching beforehand so some universities like macquarie don't offer students standalone entry into that fourth year of the degree you need to be part of the degree before that to get into the entry into the fourth year program but other universities and colleges do so you just need to do a little bit of homework to find out what would be the right place for you my advice for as someone who is looking to do honours in a couple years time at macquarie is just work hard keep doing well in your subjects don't be too hard on yourself if you're not getting amazing marks just keep going keep working hard use the support services available that we have such as the numeracy center that we talked about before and as long as you're passionate as long as you're working hard there's so many options available to you whether you do psychology honours here or at another uni or whether you graduate with your bachelor of psychology degree so definitely a lot of great advice definitely a lot of ways to go about it and just keep going yeah i think that's the most important thing that it's really easy i think particularly when you're experiencing the hsc and the intense stress that that is it's really easy to put a lot of pressure on yourself but remember that if you enjoy something if you're engaged with it you're going to get so much out of it and you're going to do better if you enjoy it and that means that the most important thing is that you kind of give yourself the best chance that you can at doing well don't put too much pressure on yourself from first year first year is absolutely a learning experience or you just develop the skills and the things that you need to do in order to get better in second year better in third year and the world's your oyster after that absolutely um so we've got a question here that says if i want to pursue child psychology as a career what would be some of the steps i would have to go through to get there so there's a couple of different ways you could do that if you wanted to work as a school psychologist or kind of a developmental psychologist in a school or something like that most people would have a master's degree either in clinical psychology or clinical neuropsychology it depends on what exactly you mean by working as a child psychologist but if you want to call yourself a psychologist if you want to be a practicing psychologist you need that six-year pathway to be completed and that's your undergraduate degree plus honours which is the first fourth year and then a master's program or an equivalent postgraduate qualification after that so you need all those things if you want to call yourself a psychologist be practicing as a psychologist but if you want to work with children specifically if you want to work in schools you could either do clinical psychology or clinical neuropsychology thank you for that we might have time for one last question so um if you guys have anything that you wanted to send in we can answer them uh we've got one here that asks um if i want to do a double degree of psychology and cognitive brain science does that atar remain the same yeah yep it does yeah it does so if you have a look at the course handbook information on the openday website get all the information about atars but yeah it does for that specific question so thank you so much for your questions guys um it's been really fun talking to you guys and hopefully answering everything you'd like to know thank you dr b so much for giving up your time to be here and give the expert advice on on everything psychology absolutely my pleasure um the the really good news is if we didn't get to your question uh we do have live chat just down here in the bottom corner of your screen where you can talk to an academic talk to one of dr beat's colleagues and they'll answer everything you want to know in a personalized consult online otherwise you can go to our other sessions at 12 30 and 2 30. dr beth will be back we'll be answering more questions so definitely tune into that also we have moderators talking about uh the other questions you've posted in the q a forum that are typing to you now as we speak so don't forget as well to check the on demand videos and downloadable content that we have both on psychology page and other areas of the open day website if you do want to check out post grad psychology or another area that the university studies you can head back up to the main stage up here and then from there go to the other areas of study so thank you so much for joining us after this live q a after our psychology um like our pre-recorded questions it's been great talking to you guys and we'll see you again soon bye hope to see some of you guys next year