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Hey, everyone. I'm Daniel Milnor. I'm a documentary photographer based in Santa Fe New Mexico and Costa Mesa, California I work primarily on my own projects. I've done documentary work in all parts of the world Europe Asia Latin America and I also Have self-published over a hundred of my own books so if any of that sounds interesting stick around because Marc Silber is going to ask me a variety of questions relating to specifically this material Welcome to the Marc Silber show advancing your photography where we bring you tips from remarkable photographers? about how to take photographs you love Dan, thanks for joining us on advancing your photography. Thanks for having me all right Tell me about your approach to photography and the type of work You really love to do well the work that I like to do the most is documentary work, so I do long-term Mostly Black-And-white projects both here in the us and abroad and most of these are topics that I've dreamed up myself most of them are topics that I've fund myself and I go back over and over and over until I have a body at work, and then recently I started publishing self-publishing books of that work And that's primarily what I work on I also do a lot of portraiture I've done a lot of portraiture over the past couple of years that I'm sort of phasing out of that now and I'm going to Spend as much time as I possibly can working on my own projects on the documentary side What are some of the key things that you use every time you pick up a camera even before you pick up one? what I do before projects is very similar in the sense that Develop the idea of developing the idea of what the project is is a critical part [like] what's the project? What's the story? how my best going to tell that which is going to dictate which format or you know if I'm shooting digital or film or square Black-And-White and I do my research So I think that's one thing that gets a little bit lost these days is when you do Documentary work a lot of times You know you can go and just wing it [you] go somewhere and shoot and that's a lot of fun But if you have a specific theme in mind or a specific story that you're going to tell I think in some cases It's better to do some research upfront which can really Maximize the potential you have when you're in the field especially if you have limited time, so I'll do my research I'm always taking the same cameras with me for the most part and I try to keep it simple cool Do you nail that story down before you go I? Nail it down every single time and then five minutes after I'm in the field it changes so I think that that's just the nature of doing documentary work unless it's a time specific an Event like if you're covering a political convention where you're covering you know a religious festival That's four days long, and you have an idea of what you want to do that Is that's kind of a story that what I hope it has borders on it that I didn't see the borders I could feel the borders. I know what I'm going to what what I can expect to see a Lot of the projects I do Documentary wise don't have boards. I have an idea or a concept I do some research And then I feel my way around in the field and what typically happens is five minutes after I'm in the field I meet someone I see something that takes me in another direction and I the story Expands and the difficult part is keeping you know some sort of Restriction on how big the story gets because otherwise you can just be you know you can basically Shoot and never have sort of that intensity that you need to tell the story, right? Obviously, we're all trying to come up with images that do tell a story so what are some things that work for you you have To make some decisions as a photographer you have to make some I guess rather painful realizations about telling stories with photographs which doesn't necessarily mean that Every image, you make is aesthetically Unbelievable or beautiful you know a book of 25 beautiful photos might not tell any story at all So when you realize okay, the primary goal of this project is to get the point my concept across It means you might have to shoot images that are what I call transitional pictures that may not be aesthetically beautiful But they give the viewer a little piece of information that they might not know about or might not understand and it links them Back to those really powerful images that are your best work so again You know a book of 25 images or a story of 25 that could be a portfolio More than it is telling a story and that that's a decision you have to make her on Sedan jumping to a whole other area of your photography with kids What are some good tips for getting great? Photographs of children you have to think like a kid. You know if you're I'm about six feet tall Maybe a little less and If I approach someone who's you know two and a half feet tall it's a it's a you know kind of an intimidating thing So it depends on how you approach it's a it depends on the dialogue that you have with them and Kids are very inquisitive, so when I initially go to do a kid shoot I spend a lot of time sitting on the floor with my equipment and The kids love the equipment, and they want to run their hands over it. They want to look through it They want to see it It gives them an idea of what's going to happen and you're basically immediately building some sort of conversational bond with the kids Once you've photographed a specific person or kid or kids over a period of time every time you go back that initial Experiment that you had or that initial conversation is just an accepted part of the plan and so you can exponentially Increase I think the Quality of your work the more times you go back and photograph the same kids and kids are great in a 45 minute time span They will laugh they'll cry they'll fall down and again. It's all right in front of me. They're not hiding anything You know kids will will tell me you know their their deepest secret and cry at five minutes after meeting them and that in terms of photography is a Really powerful thing to be able to experience with them absolutely Okay on that point in terms of engaging your subject and getting the emotions that you're looking for how do you do that? It depends on the kind of work with kids There's an immediate like I said a dialog that that starts from the minute. I walk in the door You know I'm continuously talking to them So in many cases when I'm working in the field I have there's an initial conversation before I can begin to shoot who am I what am I doing? What's the purpose of the work those are things that you have to establish? You know before you start in some cases Once those are established. I try to pull back because I'm looking for real people doing real things in the world I'm not orchestrating I don't necessarily even want to talk to people because I know that it will control and influence the scene in front of me and There's something really fun About doing documentary work when you get to a certain [level] where it's almost as if you can physically make yourself disappear, and I know that's obviously impossible it sounds funny, but depending on the energy that you're either taking in or putting out you can very much disappear into a scene and One of the quotes that I hear from people that I've done documentary work with is You know I'll show them prints and books of the material to get their feedback And they'll say I didn't even realize you were there, and I was this close to them while I was shooting And it wasn't necessarily a single frame it was frame after frame after frame because they're involved in what they're doing And I'm involved in what I'm doing, but I'm not physically like pushing my energy on them to become a part of the scene So it's completely different with kids. I'm putting my energy out there because I want that interaction and with documentary work I sort of yo-yo that effect if I need it. I do it and if I don't I pull back Okay in terms of composition any particular tips Because I use the 35 and even with the 50 is I'm always looking for a foreground mid-ground in a background because I want that Lens to Build depth in a 35 millimeter image, I don't want a one-dimensional flat photo. I want something close something in the middle and something in the background that are all related and the light working on those three planes and when you get that it just gives you a sense of three dimension on a One dimensional photograph that's really the key for me Any final tips for viewers who just want to become better photographers? Sure, there's a lot of tips one is shoot what you like I think which seems like a no-brainer, but I think you'd be surprised how many Photographers are working on projects that they think they should be working on and not Necessarily what they believe or that what they feel inside. They should be working on. I think that's really key. It's always going to show Don't rush it. I think today. We live in a fast world We've all got our mobile phones and computers, and we're connected all the time Time frames have been cut and cut and cut and cut but there is no no substitution for time access in the field the longer you can spend the better your photos are going to be and You know if you rush it it's going to show in the work and the people the Significant people within the photography world whether it's a curator or a gallerist or a publisher? They will see that I think immediately whether or not you have that connection Hey, dan, thanks for joining us on advancing your photography absolutely. Thanks for having me you bet Be sure to subscribe to our blog now to stay updated on my show And we'll give you tips and insight to keep Advancing your photography also check out our guests website for a closer look at their work Tune into our next episode of advancing your photography for an inside look at another photographers world Until then this is Marc Silber reminding you to get out and capture your own images of life

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hey guys how's it going I hope everyone's doing well I'm here today with seven powerful tips you can use when photographing in the mountains I'm super excited for this video because Mountain scenes are my absolute favorite type of landscape to photograph there's just something so sublime about hiking and being in the mountains it's really beyond words. the power - forces greater than we can possibly invoke. the beauty - they can stop us dead in our tracks at first sight. the constant change - from morning to night from one week to the next there's new things to explore every time we visit. they fill us with peace and solace, with fear and exuberance and anyone who climbs them can't help but be humbled in their presence. it's no wonder they pull in the heartstrings of many hikers and landscape photographers. Mountains present a number of challenges and things we need to plan for. more specific to hiking photographers, we have to juggle with the regular requirements and gear such as the 10 essentials + whatever camera gear we decided to bring balancing weight and mobility all the while. all the normal rules of landscape photography and composition apply, but there are some unique challenges we are presented with when in the mountains. I'm continually finding ways to improve my own process and have compiled 7 tips you may find useful for your next trip, whether you're an absolute beginner or a seasoned photographer, I hope you can take something away from it, so let's get started. tip number 1 - do the research ahead of time. in the military we had a saying, "failing to plan is planning the fail" and while the consequences typically aren't as severe with photography the same sentiment can be said for photo trips. exploration on location is an important part of the landscape photography process, but planning ahead can help you be in the right general area at the right time. so before you even step out that door make sure to research your destination and its current conditions. research can be divided into several categories: 1- finding a location. we covered how to find a location using the social networking site meetup in the last video which you can find in the description below. 2 - hike research. things like GPS tracks and topo maps what type of pass we're going to need, trail conditions, any hazards that we're going to come across, all these things are important normal consideration anytime we're hiking in the backcountry. 3 - photo research you'll want to check out sites like 500px.com, Google Earth and one of my personal favorites is to search the hashtag of the locations name on Twitter and Instagram because that usually brings up more recent photos. by doing this it will help us pre-visualize and pick the right gear. you know we want to look for composition ideas, but at the end of day we want to make our own photo. finding unique original landscape perspectives to photograph is much more enjoyable and much easier to get the creative juices flowing, so don't spend too much time trying to track down the exact tripod holes of someone else's shot. 4 - weather; of course there's several sites and apps to get average forecast at expected conditions. Mountain-Forecast.com is one of my favorites because you can set the elevation according to where you plan to go. 5 - light conditions: this is speaking directly to us as photographers. of course we want to know things like the sunrise and the sunset times the moonrise the moon set times and the moon phase. by knowing when both Sun the moon rises set and knowing their position and angle in the sky we'll be able to set up our composition in a way that captures that dramatic light. we can use apps like the photographer's ephemeris as well as Google Earth. Tip number two, and for good reason: it's the two hour rule. you've most certainly already heard about the golden hour and experienced it - that magical time with dynamic light around sunrise and sunset. the problem is they call it the golden power not the golden two hours or golden we don't know yet until we get there and find out but what I find happens quite often is that photographers either show up too late or leave too early and much of the magic that actually happens doesn't occur right around the time of sunrise and sunset especially in the mountains. the most difficult thing is being there, getting up for sunrise or sunset, managing the elements, waking up in the dark driving in the dark, hiking in the dark, putting on a headlamp, getting out in the cold, managing all the different things that are occurring, and even though Mother Nature doesn't always cooperate...all these biting flies, a perfect example of that I can't think of a single time that I've regretted getting up. I follow the logic of the saying I'll sleep when I'm dead. So just do it - you can make great, even amazing photos at any time but being there during that changing light gives you a greater chance to create a more dynamic scene. unless you are at the summit where you can see out to the horizon when you're in the mountain the Sun can set a couple hours earlier or rise a couple of hours later than the actual time that it breaks the true horizon. and if you are in a valley somewhere where the Sun doesn't come into view a couple hours after actual sunrise then most of the magic will actually be gone by the time you see it. depending on your location, the peaks could block the Sun and shorten or even eliminate the golden hour. a tip to maximize your time in nature is with a simple overnight trip that way you can hike in at a relaxing pace midday location scout with plenty of time to find interesting composition ideas before sunset and then after sunset decide to get a good night's rest or plan for astrophotography and then get up for sunrise in the morning and hike out by 10 a.m. so in less than a day you've gotten two to three different photo shoots and really explored the location under different lighting conditions. tip number three - keep your camera accessible. I see so many photographers with their gear tucked away in a bag on their chest or worse yet and the bottom of their backpack and the reality is that some things in nature just don't happen twice, so that moment, that picture-perfect moment will come and go before you have the chance to react, whether that's the red alpenglow on some distant mountain peak or the still reflection in an alpine lake or the wildlife that just comes into view by the time your futzing with your camera and getting it all ready to go it'll be over so it's very important to keep your camera accessible. I prefer to keep my camera right here on my chest I also keep my tripod to the side of me instead of on the back of my backpack. the lens cap it's got to be off, you don't want to walk around with the lens cap on, you can use the lens hood as protection or UV filter if you really feel like you need to and in terms of settings for your camera you want that to reflect the fact that you're walking and you are probably not going to have the time to set up a tripod because if you do that at that time you can change the settings of the camera so auto ISO is your best friend so think about how you want to carry your gear how you want to walk with it. there's still ways that you can protect it and keep it safe I have it here in my chest but I also have it backed up on a leash here so just in case it was to ever fall out it's protected. tip number four - find your foreground. when everyone is shooting at the same location it can be discouraging if you are wanting to create something unique but a great way to do that is to find your own perspective using foreground. a good foreground draws the viewer in and creates a sense of depth, so ask yourself "how can I lead my viewer through the image?" and then get close, get low, change your perspective, change the height of the tripod if you're using one. reflections, shapes, lines can all be used to draw the viewers eye through the scene and if there aren't many interesting elements one option can be the human form which brings us to the tip. tip number five - use a sense of scale. with natural elements like trees mountains and lakes it's often hard to tell how large or small everything really is. of course this can be further exaggerated as an effective way to make an abstract image but for more traditional landscape scenes it usually helps to add a sense of scale and a great way to do that is with the human form not only that but a person in the scene often acts as a focal point and can help the viewer connect more deeply with the experience of being there subjects might include a person such as yourself or your adventure buddy or your own legs, a physical object such as a tent, kayak or a hammock or any other number of things. tip number six - watch your contrast. you may see a beautiful lake but since the lake isn't being directly lit the camera might see all the distracting leaves on the edges of the frame catching light. the viewers eye will naturally be drawn to the brightest parts of the scene or the parts of the scene with the most contrast. a quick and easy way to determine the strongest point of contrast if it's not obvious is to squint and blur the scene in front of you. now ask yourself "what is the brightest object?" and then open up your eyes. if that's not your subject or something leading to your subject then you might want to reconsider how you capture that frame. tip number seven - bring a telephoto, and I'm referring here to lenses with a focal length 200 millimeters or longer, preferably more than 300. most people already know about the importance of having a wide-angle lens the capture the expansiveness in one frame. you've seen those shots with flowers in the foreground sweeping middle-ground with the mountains in the back, but one of the best things about those expansive views is the telephoto's ability to reach out grab a snippet from the landscape to focus on. this can be especially useful in inclement weather or if you're not at the scene during prime lighting conditions where using a wide-angle would result in too much contrast in the scene. almost all of the wildlife shots in my portfolio are a result of having a telephoto lens on me and being able to act in the moment and respond to the animals presence. to recount, 1. do the research ahead of time 2. show up before and stay after sunrise and sunset, 3. keep your gear ready and accessible, 4.find your foreground, find your perspective, 5.add a sense of scale, 6. watch for contrast and 7. bring a telephoto lens. so that's it for this video, stay tuned subscribe and hope to see you again soon!

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Now today I want to talk to you about eCommerce photography now eCommerce is a booming industry and with it so is eCommerce photography now we've got this amazing blog post covering all aspects to do with eCommerce photography and I know that a lot of you don't like long reads so I'm going to talk to you about everything in that blog post here today in this video. Now as well as this particular video within the blog post which can be found at KarlTaylorEducation.com navigate to our blog and you'll find your way to this eCommerce blog post within this blog post we have two more videos. One of them is an eCommerce fashion video that shows you how to do eCommerce catalog fashion shots with just a three light setup and the other one is an eCommerce product video a sort of cosmetic style shop white-on-white and that's done with continuous LED lighting so you'll find those videos very very useful if you have an interest in eCommerce photography. Now, where was I? So eCommerce photography, if it's done correctly it can be quick and it can be an easy way to make money but there are a few tricks to getting it right now in the recent how-to video that I did with broncolor's Urs Recher, we showed you an effective lighting setup for shooting eCommerce fashion but there's much more to online sales than just fashion shots so whether you're shooting fashion or products I've outlined a few important guidelines for you that will help produce the best possible results simply and easily. So how to shoot eCommerce photography, there's no denying that strong photography will help sell images (will not sell images) that sell products, and that's why product photographers are some of the highest-earning photographers in the industry. Now eCommerce, although it's a much simpler form of advertising photography it's still equally powerful in persuading consumers to buy but there are a few key details that we need to keep in mind when shooting. Number one, as always is preparation. Now whether it be ironing clothes, cleaning and dusting a bottle of shampoo, or thinking about the shots that you need or testing your lighting beforehand. Preparation is key to any successful shoot now you can never be too prepared when it comes to photography so take your time with this part of the shoot some of the key things to do before the shoot include preparing your items creating a shot list of your items and thinking about preparing your lighting now preparing your items could include a variety of things it largely depends on the items that you're going to be shooting for example if you're shooting clothes make sure the items are clean and ironed pay attention to details like loose threads or missing buttons these may seem like minor things but correcting them before shooting will save you a lot of hassle further down the line and a lot of post-production work further down the line now if you're shooting packshot products for example it might be a box of tea or it might be various different products make sure that the products sit well and that there's no open edges on the shape of the boxes remember that many pack shots involve shooting boxes or cartons or items that are packaged and how that packaging sits is very important sometimes you actually need to take the cartons apart reglue them or blu-tack them in place or use double-sided tape so that they sit properly now one other thing that is really important with product shots for e-commerce is to organize all of your products into different size groupings of similar items and this is really imperative because if you're going to do a batch of e-commerce shots in one day you want to maximize how many products you can get through with the same lighting setup so if you start off with a all cosmetic product and then you go to a giant toy for example you're gonna have to move the camera change lens and potentially even change your lighting so group items together based on size and similarity as well now before you start shooting make sure you have that comprehensive shot list based on size of items etc and include details such as which items need to be photographed how many different angles are required for each product and what if any props might be required to go along with the product for each image now once you have an idea of the shots that you need you can start thinking about your lighting what are the products you're shooting what are they what surfaces do they have what color are they do they need soft light do they need a slightly harder more sparkly light and the key thing is to bring out the best of your product you have to represent it in its best way to help sell it now ideally though you'll still want a versatile repeatable lighting setup that will allow you to shoot a multitude of objects or products without having to adjust your lighting for each shot because what we're talking here is is ecommerce isn't you know very similar what we used to call it was pack shop photography and the way to make money with pack shot photography was consistency it was the ability to have a lighting setup that you could put an object down press the shutter button then put the next object in and press the shutter button and so on and so on and you want that repeatability but you want it with clean pure white so that you don't have to do any cutout work so your lighting has to be absolutely perfect and in one of those videos that I mentioned earlier I demonstrate exactly how you can achieve that pure white look without the needs for cutouts and this is again why the preparation part is so important you're basically trying to create a production line of photography of images of objects so having those objects well prepared the cartons the boxes reflective items size of items and organizing yourself really well first will help you rapidly shoot through those objects in a day and get more shots done be more productive and therefore basically make more money from the shoot okay the next thing we're going to look at is equipment now really ecommerce requires very little in terms of equipment you can get away with little more than two or three lights and reflectors for your lighting and any half-decent DSLR or mirrorless camera will be good for the job but you will need a good tripod I recommend a good solid based tripod because you want that consistency you don't want to accidentally tap your tripod on the whole tripod move so get yourself a really good decent weighted tripod now other useful accessories for e-commerce photography which you'll see oars and I use in the videos that I mentioned that are in our blog post on Carl Taylor education these include the base that you're going to use for your product to sit on or your model to stand on now in these videos we used a white acrylic sheet for the base surface because that white acrylic sheet is highly reflective and it reflects the back wall or the back white lighting and it reflects it really cleanly onto the base as well so you end up with a background and the base surface that are pure white and therefore you don't need to do any cutout work now the white acrylic sheet for the base surface is what's commonly used but you may use white foam board you may decide that you need your products on a black material it depends obviously on the type of e-commerce photography that you're doing but most cases you're going to be looking at doing e-commerce type shots on pure white a computer laptop tethered shooting is another good thing to consider to tethering cable a large silver reflector can be a useful accessory as can just be large sheets of white foam board to use as reflectors as well now those are just some of the basics that you'll need for any e-commerce product shot which you'll find will come in hand for many different situations now you can learn more about my top 10 accessories for studio photography in another blog post that we have on Carl Taylor education and it's also another video on our YouTube channel okay let's talk about lighting now while there are many blog posts out there that advocate for natural light there is no doubt that studio lights will allow for far greater control and allow you to shoot at any time of day so ecommerce photography typically features those clean white backgrounds with bright well lit products and it's easier to accomplish this with studio lighting than it is with natural light now as I mentioned in the video we've got one video here where we demonstrate with three studio lights that are flash studio lights and then we demonstrate another e-commerce shot which is three lights that are continuous LED lighting so your options are there and are available for you to consider which type of lighting will work best for you now my top three tips for creating white backgrounds are consider the position of your light the height the angle and the distance from the background will all have an impact on the result remember you can measure your RGB values in your tethered software now I usually do this in my focus software you can do this in capture one and you can measure the values in Lightroom as well if you're using Lightroom tethered now you generally want to get your white values very close to two five five in the red channel the green channel and the blue channel 255 indicates that you've achieved pure white but you don't want to go beyond it so it's best to start actually below 255 and acknowledge and see that you have achieved say to 5-0 and then you know you're not over exposing the background and gone beyond 255 because the software won't register anything over to by five so start slightly below it and then increase the lighting gradually till you hit it and then you've just peaked out a pure white rather than over exposing the background and potentially damaging bleaching and causing flare onto your products by being dramatically overexposed on the background now that is a really key tip with for product photography because one of the dangers is flare flare can make your subject appear flat and washed out and you definitely want to avoid that so be very very careful with those measuring those values from your light coming from the background or the light on your pure white background now the setup shown in the videos that I've mentioned that are on the blog post on Carl Taylor education comm are particularly good if you're shooting fashion for one of the videos but if you don't have three lights you can also achieve some great results using just one light and a large octa box from an overhead position and you can see that in this particular portrait photography class on our website where I get great results just with one light setups as well two light setups allow you more versatility and you can do this with affordable modifiers and you can see a great tutorial that we've got on Cal Poly education here as well now all of these lighting setups are ideal for shooting with a model because they're versatile in nature of the lighting which allows for a very fluid shooting process which is what you want with e-commerce fashion photography especially you want to be able to shoot many pictures and many different poses many angles and you want the model to have the freedom for example if we look at some of my commercial work you'll see that the fashion images are very much more locked down and rigid because the lighting is very much more specific to a specific place or point that type of lighting isn't suitable at all for e-commerce photography because it's not versatile because as soon as the model moves ahead body angle or position then the certain area or feature of the light changes and then the the subject material changes what you need for e-commerce photography is a lighting style where the model has complete flexibility and versatility to move around in any position and yet the shop will work from any angle so it's a different type of lighting compared to some of my usual fashion work that you can see here now when it comes to lighting and shooting products for e-commerce you can easily get away with a two light setup using just a reflector and a large softbox or a medium-sized softbox you can see that in some of our previous live shows now other accessories that you might find useful include diffusion material mirrors the white and black foam board that we mentioned and depending on your subject you may want to either maximise texture or reduce unwanted reflections so you have to think carefully about the position and the distance of your light in relation to the product and again keep in mind the fact that you need a versatile setup that will allow you to work quickly and efficiently with your shot list and that production line you've got of all the products lined up ready to shoot now the next thing to consider is the shooting process once you've got your lighting set up for e-commerce photography make sure your tripod is firmly in position and that your product and subject looks as good as it possibly can and that you're ready to start shooting now in theory this is where all your planning will come together the better that you've planned the smoother your shooting will go now although you'll want to work quickly don't forget to pay attention to the details and this is why tethered shooting can be particularly helpful because you can see those details much more clearly than you can if you're just trying to look at the image on the back of the camera now remember to refer to your shot list throughout the shoot and double-check it the end so that you haven't missed anything out and that your client is going to come back to you and say oh you've missed one or two shots and then you've got the problem of setting up the whole ecommerce packshot thing again but you don't want to do so really be thorough with your checklist and your shoot list now finally we need to consider post-production now while I strongly encourage you to get as much right in camera as possible don't neglect the finishing touches in the post-production stage now in the videos on the blog post here you'll see that we actually produce really high quality e-commerce images without any post-production and that's what you need to be aiming for but you may well still need to fix the odd blemish and flaw in the product or fashion shot typically this could include applying simple crops to your image increasing the exposure slightly or liquefying rough edges or doing just removing blemishes or fixing stray hairs those sort of things now while you don't want to spend hours on each shot correcting these little details will make a big difference for your client and the likelihood of you getting rebooked again for packshot and e-commerce photography now if you're looking to share these images to social media or upload them to an online store or an online website there are a few things you will have to do before putting the images out there now some of the common adjustments that you may need to include are resizing your images to the correct dimensions and we've got a great class on resizing the images and the other thing to consider is applying slight sharpening to the images and the final crop as well and the amount of sharpening that we apply for images for the web we cover in depth on one of our micro Photoshop tutorial classes here on Carl Taylor education comm now one other important thing that can really help improve your workflow in the post-production is that you'll find when you're doing Photoshop retouching on ecommerce images you'll find that you're really usually doing the same sort of commands either lightening the exposure a little bit pulling up the highlights a bit adding a little bit of contrast applying a certain crop and quite often they'll be exactly the same command over and over again so think about creating your own actions that you record and then you save that action and then you can just simply play that action again when you've got another batch of images and when you play that action it will run through all of those folder of images automating those Photoshop commands so that you don't have to do them manually and that can be a huge speed up to your workflow if you're not familiar with how to create actions in Photoshop again we've got a wonderful class on Carl Taylor education that teaches you exactly how to do it if you enjoyed this video please click the like button and why not subscribe to our Channel remember to click the notification bell to stay updated with our latest videos