Results for learn photography

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Welcome to Pixel Viilage and I'm Radhakrishnan. In the photography world there is this saying that digital photography actually democratized photography. If you come to really think about it something else is actually really contributed to democratizing photography A mobile So in this video we want to give you few tips on how to improve your mobile phone photography. But for demonstration purposes we're going to two-and-a-half-year-old phone. Just only to show you that it's not exactly the four the phone or quality or resolution that really matters, what matters is how you use those equipments. So onto the shoot. So, first thing first its mobile phone photography all right but it's photography Which means a mobile phone should be given the same respect which you would give a conventional photography camera. I have few tips for you, first let's start with the lens itself, because it's a mobile phone and usually carry it around on your body, it's highly likely that the glass in front of the lens could be smeared with oil, body lotion, dust etc which will affect the quality of the image. Carry a small lens cleaning cloth something that you would use to clean your specs for example. Make sure that your the glass is cleaned properly. The next one is go into the camera app and activate a three by three grid and as we go along I will explain to you how to use those grids effectively and compose your image. Last but not the least is holding the phone itself I've seen lots of people holding the phone like this with one hand and trying to take a picture with the other. Obviously you're going to end up with a shaken image. I recommend that you hold the phone with both hands exactly how you would hold a camera. Pull the hands and use either your thumb or your index finger to take the picture and that will help you shoot a sharp image. Now let's move around and see if we can get good subjects to shoot I just located two gentlemen sitting there you know having their conversation after their morning walk, let me walk towards some take their permission and see if I can get some interesting shots there with them So I've asked for the permission they've granted me the permission to shoot. So next thing is when I look at them very interesting faces, looking at the place where they are sitting in there are lot of distraction in the background but they have very interesting faces. If you can just walk tell me till that wall there yeah please thank you thank you thank you please. So typically when you you know you pull out the camera what will you do you take out okay he will pose for you and you take a picture correct? But of course you got the person, now, since you've got an interesting face the best way is to go close fill the frame and shoot. Now, I'm going to go close, nice. Now the background is bright I think if I but make the background a little dark this picture will improve. So, I'm going to move them in front of this like see now look at the light and see the difference. Wonderful. To me it is very nice The next one is use of frame within the frame. So, when I looked at it I saw this interesting black doorframe and I thought I will frame him inside that okay can you come here please? You know in a situation like this you would pick up your frame and pick up the camera and take our picture but if you want to really make the picture look interesting you can use the next direction, which is include this frame in our frame. So sir can you come inside stand inside come forward slightly yes and face that way so because he is framed that picture suddenly got a different dimension very nice So this is another way of capturing the image Varun is my friend's son and he's a young YouTuber. What would you like to give to your details to our viewers? My channel's name is LabScienceTheOne. It deals with all your questions about science. So please watch it. Okay wonderful. So he's going to be a you know a hit on YouTube soon. So there they were playing, you know, basketball so I thought I can demonstrate the rule of third. So let me arrange. Okay Varun, can you stand there? Alright you come in squat in front right. There are many ways I can take this shot. I can do a shot like this, I can shoot like this, but the best way would be to keep them at that golden point of the frame, so you got a nice ambiance. Wow fantastic. See the picture The next one is using the leading lines in your frame and what we do is we shoot in this step here. Nice great attitude okay The trick is to find lines in your frame architectural or otherwise which will lead your eye to your subject and use those line to point towards your subject and take a shot. So another one we're going to see is the role of odds. The rule says that if you're shooting some object, try and get then in odd numbers, 1, 3, 5 et cetera. Let's take a look at it, so I'm going to shoot a flower Very nice. Now, let me add one more here Now you saw 1 & 2 & the rule of odd says the third one will make it very interesting. So, the odd numbers will make a better picture than the even numbers Yeah and I agree Great We will see one more before we wind up it's about symmetry. We as human beings love symmetry, we knowingly or unknowingly enjoy and appreciate symmetry. There is something, happens I think it's culturally ingrained in your head to appreciate symmetry. Now if you consciously bring in symmetry in your shot that shot is likely to look better. Let's see how. Now this area, nice greenery but I can also see nice symmetry roared the line of the you know manicured garden and the trees and those lines and the backdrop so well if I can just take a picture like this and of course I got a picture but if I slightly fine-tune and use the grid lines in the camera viewfinder and align the lines perfectly you get a nice symmetry I can also take in the lines in the building and frame it again so I'm using multiple rolls here now I have aligned all lines everything so what's that simple use these simple guidelines and follow it and you will be able to generate or you'll be able to take very interesting images let's recap if you see an object which is interesting an object or a person or a face which is interesting and the backgrounds the surroundings are distracting go close fill the frames and take that shot look for frames or within your frame compose your subject in front of that frame and make another interesting frame make use of the gridlines in your camera and position your subjects in that golden points and make an interesting image keep looking for interesting lines in your frame which will guide your eye onto your subject that'll create another interesting frame rule of odds is another interesting guideline which you can put into practice to create interesting images symmetry is another one once you train your eye to start looking for this it will become your second nature if you follow these guidelines while taking pictures from now on soon you will become an expert and photography will become your second nature we would like to know if this has been useful if yes give us a thumbs up and subscribe our Channel and also do let us know in our comment column well we'll be back with you with another video on photography very soon bye for now

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I've always played sport throughout my life. I love it and because I couldn't quite compete in it, maybe at the high level, I wanted to photograph it. I'm Julian Finney, sport photographer. Today I'm going to do something different and exciting with a young photographer. We're going to head to a climbing center in North East London. Hi, I'm Julian. Francis, nice to meet you. Let's go inside. Let's go. My name is Francis Augusto. I am a photographer and I'm someone that really enjoys people stories. At the moment in my career I feel like I've photographed nearly every sport there is. Sports like climbing, it's new to me, so it's a fresh kind of challenge, and I like to keep being challenged in photography and to continue to create new work. How are you going to approach this, Francis? Trying to get me more abstract than I normally do. With Julian learning how he's able to reproduce the same quality every time. That's what I'd like to learn, and it really comes down to me never having had a mentor in photography. So you can see our athletes warming up right now, and what we've asked them to do is to go up and down the wall as quickly as they can, and in a consistent motion. I'm basically gonna lock off a camera on my tripod and using the burst feature on the Canon camera to fire off a whole load of frames, and we're going to create a gif at the end. I'm so excited for this. This is something I've wanted to do for a while, it's like a creative take on a sports action shot. Three, two, one. I really wanted to get this. It's brilliant. Look how fast she's coming down the wall. That's a great sport photography moment and you've captured it. Coming from you that means a lot, my man. Yeah, I was really inspired today. Working with other photographers, it's always good to collaborate and discuss other ideas. I think that's really useful. I'm a big fan of understanding what you can't do and asking for help. When I think about what I'm ambitious about, in terms of photography, it really just comes down to people with stories. I think everyone has a story and the ambition is to find new mediums in photography to tell those stories in different ways.

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- So we made it on location, we're here in Brooklyn, New York, it's about 6 p.m. so the light is getting really golden-y and nice. We're about to wander the streets around here and find some nice streets to shoot on. But before that, let's intro our model. So this is our model for today, come on over here. - Hey, everyone. - This is Isabella, we're both based out of New York, so we shoot a lot around here, we kind of know the area. But we're gonna kind of look through the outfits she brought today, and figure out what kind of looks we're gonna go for. - And I brought a few looks that I think you would like. - All right, let's see what you got. - Let's go through this. - I think if we're gonna shoot daytime right now, we should save the lighter clothes for maybe nighttime stuff. Do you have anything a bit darker? - I have this. - I kind of like this black and red, kind of look. - Okay. - So maybe let's go for that. - Totally I can start on this one. - Okay, sweet! - Sounds good! - And then you'll throw on your pointe shoes of course. - Mm-hmm. - Yeah. Sweet. (upbeat music) So we made it to the first location I had in mind. I kind of actually walked past here when I was meeting Isabella, I kind of like this because of the two sides of the tree like intertwining. It can make for a really nice perspective shot. I have my Nikon Z7 with me, but we're gonna switch to my 85, to make it a little bit more telephoto. Especially because we are shooting Isabella full-body. And something I like to do before shooting the model in place, is just getting my settings correctly, so I'll probably just stand right here and see what we're working with. I always have settings from the shoot before. So let's just take a test shot right now. (shutter clicks) So right now, I have my shutter to 1/1000 and then my ISO I'm gonna boost up to just 160, we're setting our shutter a little bit higher because of the motion we're about to shoot. And then I'm just gonna go in and change my white balance to whatever looks the best to me personally. So we're gonna move from auto to cloudy, just it gives a little bit of a nice glow. I think that looks pretty accurate to real life. So right now it's kind of nice, soft light we're getting back here, and that way it won't distract too much from the model because of Isabella's posing is a little bit more complex than we're used to, so we can have the background just be a nice, like little painting behind us. Let's do a jump. Can we do a jump? Yeah. So I'm gonna go to continuous shutter, just so I can click as fast as possible and get the movement at the right time. All right, let's try this out, first test shot. Let's go for it. And, go. (shutter clicks) Nice. I have this CD I just bring as a prop. It's super easy to throw in my bag. And it creates a kind of lens, rainbow refraction right in front of your lens, you don't have to do anything in post. And I kind of just experiment it with how close or far I'm holding it from my lens, and that way it will give you kind of a different type of look, whichever way you're holding it. (shutter clicks) What's nice also about using this CD, is once you get a shot that looks like you have the rainbow kind of in-frame, in the edit, duplicate that, and post it to a photo that actually didn't have the rainbow, and then it looks like you did it, but you actually didn't in person. Go for it. (shutter clicks) Nice. And, go. (shutter clicks) Nice, got it. I move kind of really fast when I'm shooting, especially when I'm shooting with a high continuous shutter. I think I got what I needed, at this spot, so we're gonna keep moving. (gentle music) As we're walking around trying to find some nice light with this golden hour happening behind us, we found the light, kind of nice back lighting, through these trees right here, so I'm gonna have Isabella stand right in front of that, and do like a nice, slow hair flip. And keep my settings around how they were, we need to capture that motion, pretty still. So, we have our shutter at 1/640. And then our ISO's at 250, 'cause we wanna keep that low, but it's not that hard with the nice light we have right now to keep that ISO as low as possible. For this shot, we're not gonna do full-body just because there's a lot of people coming in and out, so we're gonna shoot waist up, and I'm gonna have her focused before she goes into the motion, just to make sure I know where she's about to land that hair flip. Come up just real quick to focus. And then, one sec, and then you're good to go whenever. (shutter clicks) The light right now is really harsh behind you, so you're kind of like silhouetted but it looks nice. Come a little closer, if you can, more like right here. Yeah. And go for it. (shutter clicks) Nice. Oh my God, we got it. I also quickly just switched my 85 to my 35, just 'cause we're getting a little bit closer in on her, but I also wanted to capture some of those sun rays we're about to see with the backlight coming through. So the 35 will be perfect for that. All right, let's actually move down just a bit 'cause of this trash. So, we still have some golden hour happening, we walked a block down to this little railing. We're gonna have Isabella kind of use this to her advantage with posing, that's something I like to look for a lot when I'm shooting with someone, especially, when they're a dancer, so we're gonna get, again, some nice backlight shots, but instead, more full-body, 'cause we got a waist up shot, so. Because she's just doing one single motion, I'm just gonna do single shutter. So I don't get too many photos, just a few. Shake your hair a little bit if you can, in that pose, just kind of like wave it. (shutter clicks) For one final shot at this location, I'm just switching my lens from my 35 to my 58 1.4. Just 'cause I think that this shot I'm getting, will look a little bit better with the background slightly more blurred, and since the 58 is a closer prime, it will give us that effect, so. Let's go for it, same thing. Before the light is completely gone. Nice. Perfect. (upbeat music) So as we're making our way down to the skyline where golden hour is happening, I kind of stumbled upon this little pathway. And this is something I really like because it doesn't look like New York, so it adds some kind of variety in the shots we're getting. So we're gonna have Isabella right in the middle of this, I have my 85 on, so we can kind of get that depthy look with our telephoto, semi-telephoto lens. And my settings are pretty much the same as earlier, so. Let's get you right in the middle over there. And go for it. (shutter clicks) That was good. Let's do one with both hands up. Yeah, yeah. And, go. (shutter clicks) Nice, that was a good one. All right, let's walk to the little skyline. (upbeat music) Lens cap's on, love that. So we made our way down to the water with the skyline behind us, the sun has basically set, so we're getting a lot of nice, soft, colors behind us. And we're gonna have Isabella pose against this railing. I also have my 105 millimeter on, so we can kind of get rid of that business behind her, and get it a little bit more flatter. And I will have to compensate my settings just for how dark it's getting, but we should be good on a pretty low ISO right now. Wanna come right against this? And just kind of look out, you might actually wanna be on pointe, just to get a little taller, but move to the right a little bit just so you're nice and even. Yeah, that looks really nice there. So I briefly just took a test shot with the 105 and I actually didn't love it. You couldn't even see really the skyline 'cause it was super up close and telephoto, so I might switch back to my 35 or 58 and see how that looks. Because we're having Isabella stand in a kind of still position, we can have our shutter a bit lower at 1/250 of a second, and then our ISO is around like 500, so it's not too, too high. Nothing we can't fix when we're editing. I like that. I also don't need to be in continuous, like crazy, just 'cause we're getting some single frames here. Yeah, perfect. Keep moving, I like that a lot. Maybe off to the side, do that again, that hair flip. That was cool. (shutter clicks) Nice. Relating back to my shutter, I don't like to have it anywhere below 250, just in case I capture some blurry movement, because I do like to have my model move when she's posing in kind of like a slow, authentic way. So I want to make sure I'm capturing all those little shots. 1/250 right now is perfect just for that. But you can also change it if you want to play around with more movement, I just like to make sure that we're getting some crisp, clear shots, and nothing is out of focus or blurry. So we just finished up taking our daytime portraits, it's definitely getting a little bit darker, so we're gonna take a break, Isabella's also gonna change, and we're gonna take some nighttime shots and incorporate in some fun props, so. Stay tuned.