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Hello, my loves. Welcome back to Lavendaire. Today I want to share 20 books to read in 2020. These are books I've chosen from the past decade, books that are my favorites that have impacted my life and books that I think will impact your life for the better as well. I've sectioned the books into categories to make it easier to navigate. I have Self Help / Personal Growth books, and then some on Money & Productivity, some on Creativity, and some on Spirituality & More. So let's start with Self Help. One of my favorite books of all time is “The Four Agreements” by Don Miguel Ruiz. I've recommended this so many times before because it is such a good book to start with. It is easy to read, it's not too long. There are four main agreements: 1) Always be impeccable with your word, 2) Don't take anything personally, 3) Don't make assumptions, and 4) Always do your best. Those four agreements, he goes deep into them and why they're important. And because there's only four, they're very easy to remember and they're kind of life mantras. I remind myself of them all the time, and they've made my life a lot easier. The second book you should read is “A New Earth” by Eckhart Tolle. This one is a little more dense and harder to read, but I think it is so important because it teaches you how to recognize and be aware of your own ego, and how to detach yourself from the wants of your ego. The ego in you is the part that wants more and more and more, the part that will never be satisfied, the part that gives into fear and all of these things that are not helping you. This book teaches you how to recognize that ego and how to not be a victim to your ego. The third book I want to recommend is “Atomic Habits” by James Clear. This is the book you want to read if you want to be consistent with your habits this year. It talks about how and why habits are formed, and how you can use that information to make or break any habit that you want. The next book I want to recommend is “Mindset: The New Psychology of Success” by Carol Dweck. This is the book that's all about the growth mindset: what the growth mindset is, compared to what a fixed mindset is and why you want to have a growth mindset, how it's going to help you in life. So much of why certain people excel and grow over others is because they have a different mindset. This book goes deep into what makes up a growth mindset. The next book that will also be so helpful for your mindset is “The Success Principles” by Jack Canfield. This book is made up of a bunch of lessons, values, and parables on why people are successful. It has so many success stories. It's one of the first self help books I read and it's such a good book to lay the right foundation for your mindset and your habits moving forward. The next book you should read is a classic called “The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People” by Stephen Covey. This is a book that's been on the bestsellers list for decades, so it is a crowd favorite. It is one of those books that everyone should read. The lessons are so smart and they're so impactful, they're still relevant to this day. Following that, another book you must read is “The Power of Now” by Eckhart Tolle. I used to say “Eckhart Toll-e”, I don't know why. Someone corrected me and said it's “Eckhart TOLL”. Anyway, this book is another classic and it's all about being mindful of the present moment, why it is so important, why the present moment is the only real thing that you have. The past and the future are just illusions in your mind and reading this, understanding this concept on a deep level, will release so much stress and worry from your life. It will just help you be happier and more joyful in the present moment of your life. Another book you should read is “The Slight Edge” by Jeff Olson. I've recommended this one so many times because it's so good. This book is about the power of compounding, the power of compounding effects, compounding your actions, compounding habits. And the lesson is: If you do a small thing each day, a small little positive thing, the effects will compound over time so that you make big changes. And it's such a powerful lesson that is so key to success. The last book in this category is “The Power of Vulnerability” by Brené Brown. Brené Brown has that Ted talk on vulnerability. She's written so many amazing books since then. And this book, The Power of Vulnerability, I heard it in audiobook form because I think it's her giving lectures on vulnerability. And vulnerability is something that people need to talk about more, because once you realize how important it is to be vulnerable, you develop better relationships in your life. You become more confident in expressing yourself. You also get better at taking risks at being brave, and those are things that you need to be successful and grow in life. All right, moving onto the next category of Money & Productivity books. The first book I recommend is called “The Richest Man in Babylon”. This is a super old book. It might be even like a hundred years old, but it contains stories and - parables really - to teach you how to have a positive money mindset, to be financially literate, to see money in healthier way. This book, I just enjoyed it so much because I enjoy metaphors and stories. I feel like, rather than being a practical book, it's a book that uses stories to really engrain really valuable lessons in your mind. The next book I recommend is also gonna help your money mindset, but this one is more modern. So this one's called “You Are a Badass at Making Money” by Jen Sincero. This book is so, so helpful in helping you rewrite your limiting beliefs about money. I felt like my mindset changed so much. It transformed my mindset about money after reading this book. I just think it's something that more people should read. We should all be more financially savvy, financially literate, and just have a healthier money mindset. The next book I recommend is “Getting Things Done” by David Allen. This is a book for you if you need help in productivity, if you have so many things you want to do, but you don't know what to do first, how to organize your tasks, how to have a system of getting things done. This book helped me just prioritize things. He lays out a system that is so helpful: What emails to tackle first? What tasks to tackle first? It's so helpful for people who are not naturally organized, and even if you are relatively organized, you'll learn a lot from the process laid out in this book. The next book is another favorite of mine: “The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up” by Marie Kondo. This is one that inspired my whole journey through minimalism and decluttering, learning to keep only what sparks joy and let go of the things that I don't need anymore. Let go say goodbye and thank you. “Thank u, next” to anything that is holding me back. This book is applied to physical things, but it can also apply to non-physical things in your life. I put it under the category of productivity because I really feel like you can be more productive when your space is clear, when you have your life together, and just having this KonMari mindset. Moving onto books on Creativity now. The first book I would recommend is called “The War of Art” by Steven Pressfield. Steven Pressfield is such a great author for creatives. He talks about the war we have as creatives against resistance, procrastination, whatever that thing is that holds us back from doing our work, from creating, from taking action. So that's what The War of Art is about, and that has helped me just have a stronger mindset in my work, in my career, in creating. Another book on creativity that is more uplifting and inspirational is “Big Magic” by Elizabeth Gilbert. Elizabeth Gilbert is one of my favorite writers. This is one of my favorite books, and it just makes you see creativity from such a magical point of view. This book is for everyone, not just people who do creativity for their job, because all humans are creative. She talks about creativity as a hobby, to give you joy, to enhance your life, and it's just an amazing book. The final book in creativity is more of a practical process-type book. It's “The Artist's Way” by Julia Cameron. This is a book you want to read if you are a creative and you want to tap deeper into your creativity, because there are journaling prompts, exercises, a weekly system – I think it’s a 12-week program that you go through. And this is actually the book where morning pages originated. Julia Cameron introduced the idea of morning pages, to write three pages of longhand stream of consciousness journaling every morning to help open up that channel to creativity. This is just a great system. I did it, I think, two years ago. If you want more of a systematic approach to tapping into more creativity, then read The Artist's Way. Lastly, let's move on to books on Spirituality and beyond. The first book you gotta read is “The Untethered Soul” by Michael A. Singer. That is a book about your soul, your spirit, and it also helps you recognize who you are on the outside the surface level you vs. the deep core of yourself. And it's just one of those books on spirituality that I really enjoyed. The next book I recommend is “The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success” by Deepak Chopra. I honestly recommend anything by Deepak Chopra, and my favorite way to read his books is by listening to his audio books, listening to him speak, because I am such a big fan of him. I love his voice. He makes me feel so calm, so zen. He seems so wise, and he's just a classic. The next book I want to recommend intertwines health with spirituality. It's called “The Anatomy of the Spirit” by Carolyn Myss. I honestly had two books in mind for this slot in the 20 books, so you'll get an extra book, another book that is similar, that is also in the same realm. It's called “You Can Heal Your Life” by Louise Hay. Those are two books that I highly recommend if you are just going through any health issues, especially chronic health issues that doctors and Western medicine can't explain, because the idea is: A lot of chronic issues, health issues, stem from emotional or spiritual pain and trauma. And this is an area where I know not everyone agrees with or understands, because there's so much we still don't understand about science and health and medicine, right? But I just think it's so fascinating, because these are stories of real people who have healed in spiritual ways or just different ways than you would typically hear of. The last book on this list which makes the 20th book is on astrology. It's called “The Inner Sky” by Steven Forrest, and this is one of my favorite books that I've read because I love astrology. It was the intro book to help me dive deeper into what all of this stuff means, the stars, the planets, your birth chart. And that one is more of a personal interest book. But if you are interested in astrology, that is the book to start with because it's just so fascinating. All right, so those are 20 of my favorites/ most impactful books that you should read in 2020. If you want more books, I have a whole page on my website listing my favorite books and I try to organize it in different categories. And I also really love audio books. I didn't get to talk about the audiobooks that I loved, because I chose books that I thought would change your life and help you change your mindset, all that stuff. But I honestly really enjoy listening to memoirs. For example, Ali Wong’s audiobook: “Dear Girls”, Kevin Hart's audiobook, Trevor Noah's book, JVN – Jonathan Van Ness’s book, the guy from Queer Eye. I just love listening to something funny and a life story while I'm driving. So I'll list those recs down below as well. But I hope that this is a good list for you to start with and I'm wishing you all the best in 2020. I hope these books help you expand your mind, change your life. And I hope you make it a daily habit to read consistently, whether it's a little bit each day or a little bit each week, because consistency is what matters most. Lastly, if you haven't heard, I'm doing a 10-day New Year Challenge that you could sign up for. It's basically a free email series where each day, for 10 days, you'll be emailed a relatively easy prompt that will help you take action towards becoming the best version of yourself and creating the life that you've always wanted to live. So if you want to join the New Year Challenge, I have the link down below. Love you so much and sending you so much love and light for your life. Am I cheesy? Yeah, a little bit, but I don't care. Bye!

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(upbeat New Age music) - Hey everyone, it's your girl Jen, and today we are doing a book update. It's been officially a year since my last book update, and so I thought I would fill you guys in on my favorite books of 2019. I was doing some reflection a couple weeks ago, and I actually numbered out all the books that I read last year, and it was 42. For me, that is a staggering number, I have never ever read this many books in my lifetime. But any-hoo, today we're gonna be whittling it down to the top 10, so let's get started. So my first book is "Essentialism", by Greg Mckeown. I picked this book up because I have always been the type to feel overwhelmed, and burnt out, and spread thin, and I think it's because I've had this mentality of just, "power through it, grit your teeth, and suck it up," and I thought that that was the way I can just get everything done. But, it's not a very sustainable mentality. There are some things you just gotta say no to. I had a problem just really prioritizing what was important and what was essential in my life, and I feel like this book really gave me the right tools, and the strategies, to float up what is the most priority, and finish those top things. I've learned that sometimes doing the most isn't the greatest thing, and it's important to spend your time on the right activities and the right people so you feel more fulfilled. Being busy all the time doesn't mean that you're being productive, so if you are the type of person that just wants to Marie Condo their mind, or just learn how to use their time more efficiently, I would highly recommend this book. In 2019 Brene Brown became one of my most favorite inspirational people. If you have not seen her TED Talk on vulnerability, I highly recommend you go check it out, but I read "Daring Greatly", which is just a deep dive of the vulnerability movement, and how you can live more wholeheartedly. It had a huge impact on my self esteem, and the way I connect with people, and I especially loved the bit about empathy. So she describes empathy as "connecting with the emotion "that someone is experiencing, not the event or the circumstance." A lot of the times when someone is opening up to us, or sharing an experience that they've had, I think a common misconception is, "oh, I can't be empathetic to that because that has never happened to me." For example, let's say your friend's like, "oh my God, I went to work today, and I shat my pants." Maybe you have not shat your pants at work, however I'm pretty sure we've all felt the emotion of shame, and embarrassment, and that emotion is what we need to connect with. This book gave me a glimpse on how I can live more unapologetically, and just live more freely, and it's definitely a book that I want to re-read because it's something that I wanna keep fresh on my mind, constantly. So my next book is "Outliers" by Malcolm Gladwell. And I know this book came out a long time ago, I actually first read it when I was 18. It completely blew my mind, but it's been over 10 years, and I was like, "you know what? It's time to read it again, let's see." I read it, and it blew my mind again, and so now it's on my list. So this book is about outliers, and outliers are the most successful, the most intelligent, most athletic, just the best of the best in the world and that's why they're the outliers. And a lot of the self made outliers, we look at them and we're like, "damn, you did the damn thing." And yes, that is a huge factor, they did put in so many hours. Malcolm Gladwell says that you need to put in roughly 10,000 hours to master a craft, and that is a lot of hours, a lot of time, I can't even compute how many years 10,000 hours is, but it's a ton. But regardless, we look at these people like The Beatles, or Bill Gates, and we're like, "wow." However, Malcolm Gladwell starts digging a little bit deeper and he starts to point out patterns, and circumstances, that have happened, to have them elevated up to that level. So he defines an outlier as "those who have been given "opportunities and who have had the strength and presence of mind to seize them." So, obviously, putting in the 10,000 hours is a big one, but there are other things to consider, like when you were born, how long you've had a headstart on starting something, what your parents have, your ethnicity. There's a string of fortunate incidents and circumstances that have happened that have attributed to their success. So he uses Bill Gates as an example. He's wildly rich, wildly successful, incredibly smart, however there are some things to consider. So, Bill Gates was born at a time where computers were just starting to get big, they were pretty rare, and very expensive. A computer was the size of a room. And his parents just happened to have a computer in their house. So Bill Gates started to tinker around with it, learn how to code slowly, and then when he turned 13, his parents funded a computer club. So he had unlimited access to these computers, with all his computer friends, and they just coded. And Bill Gates just got consumed into coding, and learning, and he started to put in his 10,000 hours a lot earlier than everybody else. So by the time the computer started booming, he already had this incredible knowledge about this subject that a lot of people didn't have access to. If his parents didn't have the money to give him one of the first computers, he probably wouldn't be Bill Gates. And having a headstart is a huge thing to consider in every type of craft. If you look at all the early tech tycoons, they're all born at the same year. Bill Joy, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, there's absolutely a pattern here, and this book just does an in depth review and analysis on that, and I found it fascinating. Speaking of technology, we're gonna move on to our next book, which is called "Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology" by Adam Alter. I feel like so many of us are addicted to our screens. You are watching this on your phone, or your laptop, or your TV, wherever, we are glued. And I have an alarming statistic. "In 2008, adults spent an average of 18 minutes "on their phones a day. "In 2015 adults spent two hours and 48 minutes per day." I do not know what the updated statistics is for the year 2020, but I'm sure it has skyrocketed. I feel like some people might see it as a fault in themselves, being "oh my gosh, I can't get off my phone, I have no willpower, I am weak." But, the people behind this technology, it's their job to make it addicting as. And this book just gave me clear examples, and just peeled my eyes back on what is happening behind the people that are making this technology. So, in 2010, Steve Jobs, God rest his soul, had a talk about the Ipad, and it was just this really long talk convincing everybody why they needed an Ipad. And then later on in 2010, a New York Times article came out and Steve Jobs said that he doesn't let his children use the Ipad. I just found it interesting that the very thing that he was convincing everyone needs to use, is something that he doesn't even let his children use. A lot of the people producing these tech products avoid the very thing that they're selling, and it's because they know that shit's addicting. And he also explains these boundaries we can create in the technology space, so I found it very interesting. So my next book is called "Sapiens", it is actually the only book, the real tangible book I have, because I read the rest on Kindle, or I listen to it on Audible, but I actually got this book at an airport, and it was truly the best decision I've made. This is one very thorough book about the history of human existence. It's like if all your history, and your anthropology classes had a baby, it would be this book. I absolutely love just her clear descriptions, and also her commentary, and it just really reminded me of all the things that I forgot in all those classes that I learned. It's been a very long time since I've been in school, so if I don't have a refresher, I will not remember it. It was just really nice to be re-informed about the history and the existence of homo sapiens, and it was very impressive to see how we, as a collective unit, were able to just completely dominate the planet. We have been killin' it for a very long time. Literally and figuratively. We are the only species that know how to work as a unit, with tools, and to be able to expand and it explains why in such a short period of time we have been able to just bulldoze, and create all these agricultural revolution, and industrial revolution. We've been freaking on it, and this book just highlights all of that. It's very alarming to see how rapidly this has all been going, we have the capacity to completely destroy the planet, however we have the capacity to completely save the planet. It's kind of like the Spider-Man quote, "with great power comes great responsibility." I have hope for us. So now we're gonna move on to some fiction. I have to talk about "The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo". This book was so good, I read it twice. I literally finished it and I was, "I'm gonna hit it again." I was trying to chase the high from reading it the first time, and honestly the second time was really good because I got to catch some things that I didn't notice in the first run. It's about Evelyn Hugo, who is an icon, the Hollywood icon of the 1950s all the way to the 1980s, and with just wild fame comes some scandals along the way. So she's had seven husbands, and she's been very tight lipped with it her entire life, but the book starts when she's pretty much 70, and she's old, and so now she's ready to talk about it, and she does not hold back. The tea is hot, it's got everything. It's actually a very progressive read, there's a lot of visibility from race, sexuality, and I think that's something really refreshing to see, especially in a mainstream book. I mean, maybe I've just been in the dark with what kind of books to read, but I loved this. If you guys have any recommendations that are similar to this book, and have the visibility and representation, please let me know. Evelyn Hugo is unfortunately a fictional character, but she is real in my heart. Evelyn Hugo is a character inspired by Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor, and if you've ever been fascinated of that whole old Hollywood lifestyle, and what it was like to be there, read this book, you will be teleported in. So if you guys know me, you all know that I love me a thriller. For my thriller recommendation I have "Final Girls" by Riley Sager. This one is definitely a read to just pack on a trip, if you're on the plane, and you just want time to fly by, definitely give this a read. It's about this girl named Quincy, and she, this is not a spoiler, by the way, this happens right from the jump, but Quincy is the sole survivor of this mass murder. She was at a cabin trip with her friends, and then this killer came and killed all her friends, except for her, so she's the lone survivor, and that's why she's called a final girl. And there's only a few final girls in the world, and they almost talk to each other, because no one can really fully, fully understand what it's like to be in that position. It's like a reverse murder mystery. The killing already happened, now we're just trying to figure out who killed who. So now we're gonna finish things off with some memoirs. I wanna talk about "Hunger" by Roxane Gay. This is the book to read if you have ever struggled with body issues, body image, and even self doubt. This was one of the most honest and powerful memoirs I've read, because it was so raw. And a lot of her, the themes about self doubt, I felt like she was boiling down the doubts that I have in my head, but into text. And just eloquently written. So the author is someone in the category of super morbidly obese, but hunger really opened up my eyes to the hardships that they face from the stereotypes to the physical obstacles. It was just very enlightening. And just the part about the self doubt, I just really, really connected with her on that level. Michelle Obama, she needs no introduction. When I think of her she's the definition of poise and grace and sometimes it's easy to forget that she's just like all of us, she's just a human. And I feel like after reading this memoir it just grounded her, and I just found it really inspiring to see her work for what she's earned. She's been through a lot, and I also found it very comforting to know that Michelle and I actually have some things in common. For example, we both find huge comfort in preparation, and we both love low light dinners with our mans. So, Michelle and I are basically the same person. So my list recommendation is called "Dry" by Augusten Burroughs. I have been reading a lot of books about sobriety, and this was my favorite overview of what alcoholism is like. This memoir is a journal he kept while he was in rehab, and while he was out. And so he really does a great job describing that insatiable desire for alcohol. And so, and he explains what rehab was like, and how getting out of it was like, and then just seeing the world through this stripped, raw, vision of how far you've gone down, and then just dealing with that constant temptation of having a drink, and how prevalent it is in our lives. So that's his memoir in a nutshell, but I feel like this memoir really stood out to me because of his writing style. He has got personality, he's got sass, he's got wit, and I just found myself laughing through it, and I know it's a sad topic, addiction, but I was laughing. But yeah, this book definitely gave me a better perspective of what alcoholism is, and how to recover from it. All right guys, those are my 10 favorite book recommendations of 2019. I cannot wait to crack open some more books this year. My goal, by the end of 2020, is to read 52 books. Let's slap on another 10. Let's see if I can do it. I would love, love, love, to get your guys' book recommendations in the comments down below. I think from this video you guys get a good vibe of what I like. I wanna thank you guys so much for watching, and I'll see you guys in the next one; bye. (lips kissing) (soft New Age music)

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Hey, what is up guys? So, I have got some book recommendations for you today and I am doing these in the middle of the summer so for those of you who want to get ahead before the school semester starts. You'll have at least a month and a half. Right, Martin? About two months, maybe? So, I've got 10 books. Why am I holding up two fingers? That's not 10. 10 books that I think every student should read, starting with my favorite book from last year which is Deep Work by Cal Newport. This book is at the top of my list because it tackles the number one problem that I get emails, tweets and comments about. Which is, I can't focus. I can't stop procrastinating. I can't get into the flow of my work. And this is something I struggle with just as much as most students and I think this book really helped to point out the fact that when we get these cravings for novelty, cravings to check our Snapchat or our Instagram, or just distract ourselves from our work and we act on them. We're actually ingraining a habit and we're weakening that focus muscle in our heads. And by contrast, by avoiding those distractions and by sticking with our work we actually become more able to focus. And when that was explicitly stated to me, I took it more seriously and I found it really, really helpful in my work. Book number two on my list is a Mind for Numbers by Barbara Oakley. Now this is the learning how to learn book. In fact, there's a course over on Coursera.org that you can take for free called Learning How to Learn and it's created by the same person and this book is basically the companion to it. And even though the subtitle here is, How to Excel at Math and Science this really is a book about general learning skills. Now, this book has a lot to offer so I can't really summarize the whole thing here but a couple of the key lessons I took away from the book. Were number one, the process of memory formation how bits become chunks. Which, are essentially loosely grouped bundles of information that are connected through meaning. And it talks about how to efficiently form those chunks. And it also talks about the focused mode of thinking and the diffused mode of thinking. Now, these are two complimentary forms of thinking. Focused mode is what happens when you sit down and you focus on a problem with intensity and you're mainly using your prefrontal cortex when you do this. But the diffused mode of thinking is just as important and it uses a lot more of your brain and it's kind of what happens when you background process a problem by taking a break or sleeping on it. And a good example is, if you ever try to think of a word and it's on the tip of your tongue but you just can't get it and then you take a break, or you go for a walk, or you wake up from a nap later and it comes to you. So, these two modes of thinking help you to solve problems in a complimentary way and this books highlights the importance of taking breaks so you can use that diffused mode just as much as the focused mode. Third book on my list is Getting from College to Career by Lindsey Pollak and I think this is a great introduction to a lot of the career skills that you're gonna need to be able to get a job or the job that you want after you graduate from college. Now, I was gonna put So Good They Can't Ignore You by Cal Newport at this spot in the list, but I've already talked about that book in the past. And while that talks about that big overarching passion, hypothesis question. You know, what do I do with my life? This book really gets into the details and into the trenches of how to get a job and how to stand out amongst the competition. Talks about interviewing, how to build a resume, how to build your online web presence, all the skills you need to learn to be able to get that job that you want. Fourth book on the list. Some of you definitely guessed it would be on here. The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg. Yes, I've talked about this book before but I really think you should give it a read if you haven't done so already. And the reason for that is that habits form so much of our behavior and when you know how to intelligently build strong ones and break the ones that you don't wanna have, that are hurting you then you're gonna be so much more successful and you're not gonna be wasting as much of your limited willpower on the things you wanna get done. Book number five on my list is Spark, the Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain by Dr. John Ratey. And I'm recommending this book for two different reasons. Number one, it is a surprisingly detailed introduction to how your brain works on a biological level and I found that very interesting. But also, for a certain subset of you out there the scientific explanation of how exercise affects the way that you learn and can improve your overall brain health can be a powerful motivator to get into the habit of exercising more often. And, I know from experience that as a student or when you're just busy in general it can be really tempting to put off exercising in lieu of giving yourself more time to get your work done. But just like Cal Newport talks about in Deep Work, the intensity of your focus times the time you put in, equals your productivity. And when you don't exercise, you're robbing your brain's ability to focus intensely and work efficiently at all. Book five point five, Anime Club. 'Cause there could be no higher aspiration for a student than to run their own anime club. Very serious recommendation right there (laughs). Alright, so the sixth book on my list is The Productivity Project by Chris Bailey. And this book is my favorite general introduction to the concept of productivity. Now, when most people think of productivity they think of time management, but in this book Chris is very careful to stress that not all hours are created equal and productivity is the product of your time, attention, and energy. So to that end, the book goes through a ton of different productivity topics including procrastination, how to focus on your tasks without getting distracted, how to avoid multitasking, how to batch tasks, plan your day intelligently, and gets into things like meditation. I also like how every chapter ends with a challenge. So, if you wanna start putting things into action he gives you a lot of direction to do so. The 7th book on my list is The Happiness Equation by Neil Pasricha. I put this book on my list because a lot of us aren't actually very good at knowing what's going to make us truly happy when we're planning out our career goals or other life goals. We might look at what society seems to value or we might trick ourselves in different ways. But as Neil's research points out in this book a lot of people who are rich, or in positions of power, executives of big companies, they're not actually happy. Now this book goes through a lot of different things and there's a lot to think about but one of the biggest lessons that I took away personally from this book is that milestones don't actually make us happy. And this is something that I've had to deal with quite a bit in my life. I mean, if you look right down there at that subscriber count that's something that I use as sort of a marker for my success in my YouTube career. But, I remember the day when I hit 100,000 subscribers it didn't feel any different. The bar just kind of moved to a million and it didn't make me any happier. So, I realized that happiness actually comes from the fulfillment in the work itself, not in the external rewards. And when you can internalize that and accept it, you're gonna be a lot happier on a day to day basis. Alright, so we are now to book number eight in the list and that book is Steal the Show by Michael Port. Which is a book all about communication. Now, a lot of this book deals with how to give a great speech. How to prepare for it. How to master your body language. How to get an ovation from the audience at the end. But it also deals with a lot of interpersonal communication. Networking, job interviews, negotiation tactics, and for that reason I think it's a great all around communication skills book that you should read. Book number nine is Your Money, The Missing Manual by J.D. Roth. Which is a great introduction to personal finance. Now, there are a ton of personal finance books out there and I actually run a personal finance podcast myself so I can't tell you this is the best introduction to personal finance in the world but it's the one that I read and I found it very helpful for learning how to manage my money, how to pay off my debt faster, and how to start investing smartly. And that brings us to my final pick on this list, my ultimate book recommendation for you, which is, not actually any specific book at all. At this point in the video, I want to encourage you to go out and indulge your interests. Productivity for productivity's sake is useless so you need to be able to do something with all these personal development tips that you're learning from all these books I'm recommending you. The problem is, a lot of people who get interested in self-development, in productivity, they go too narrow. They stick to the recommended lists by online gurus and they never actually branch out and become experts in something unique. So, if you have an interest, indulge it. Go read a book about the history of the telegraph and at the next party you're at, you'll be able to tell a cool story that nobody else will know. So, hopefully you're not too disappointed that I only really had nine books on the list but I did think it was important to mention that at the end. And, I'm gonna have links to all those books down in the description below so definitely check them out. And on that note, of indulging your interests and going and learning new and unique things, I wanna recommend a channel that I really like to you guys. And that channel is Wisecrack. Now, there are a lot of education channels on YouTube but Wisecrack is one of my favorites for the way that they seamlessly blend nerd culture and education. They do it in a lot of different ways with a lot of different series, including the Philosophy of series which takes anime and movies and video games, TV Shows and it looks at the philosophy that underpins their stories. So, I'm gonna put one of my favorite recent videos from that series right there. The Philosophy of One Punch Man, along with the Thug Notes analysis of my absolute favorite book of all time The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, right there. Definitely check those out and go give them a subscription if you like their channel and thank you guys so much for watching. Hopefully you found this video helpful. Give it a like if you did and I will ya' next week.