Results for What is Leaky Gut Syndrome?

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Hey everyone, today I want to talk to you guys about a very important topic of leaky gut. Leaky gut means that the cells that line your small intestine have become damaged and the spaces that are between them, called the tight junctions have been opened up too wide. The problem with that is when the tight junctions are too wide, that allows things like undigested food particles and bacteria to escape out of the small intestine, get into the blood stream and cause a lot of immune reactions. And so in the real world, that looks like allergies, skin conditions, fatigue, chemical sensitivity, joint paint. Almost anything you can think of can be traced back to a leaky gut. Today I want to talk about some of the essential steps that need to happen to get back on track so you can heal your gut and hopefully get on a road to recovery from a lot of your chronic health issues. The first thing that we need to do when addressing a leaky gut, is to remove the offending causes. Those can be certain foods, dairy is a very common one, sugar, for some people eggs can damage the intestine if they have developed a sensitivity. The inflammation is going on there. Grains and refined vegetable oils, those are the big things that can really contribute to the problem. Also, check your medications, if you're taking a lot of Tylenol or ibuprofen or any sort of over the counter pain killer. Chronic use really wears down the intestinal lining and damages the gut. Also, it is really important to get evaluated by a professional to get check out for GI infections. So if you have GI infections going on, the inflammation that those infections cause wears down the intestinal lining. And also some of the toxins released by any bacteria can further damage the intestinal lining and stimulate the immune system and cause the problem. It's really important to find a qualified professional, get a stool test done, get checked out for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Those are some very common conditions that contribute to a leaky gut and if we don't remove those infections, there is little chance of being able to heal. The next thing we need to do once we have removed any offending infections, medications or food, is to start the repair process. The first thing I like to do is strengthen the patient's digestion. I do that by using things like betaine HCL with pepsin. Which is kind of a fancy way of saying I am replacing your stomach acid. Also, digestive enzymes can be very helpful. And also food based digestive enhancers, so things that takes bitter. Such as; artichoke, dandelion, beets, beets are sweet but they are very good for the gold bladder, cinnamon and ginger and fennel. All of those things naturally help to strengthen your digestion and gold bladder and gastric juices and enzymes, so that you can break your food down. And again, breaking food down is very important, because when it goes into the small intestine undigested, unbroken down. If you've got a leaky gut, those large undigested molecules are escaping through those tight junctions that are too wide and they are getting into the blood stream and causing a lot of inflammation and immune system problems. And so just to recap; remove any offending foods or over the counter pain killers that are contributing to the problem, get checked out for GI infections and get rid of those. That's going to take a while, maybe 8 to 10 weeks, but work with a qualified professional. And then you want to replace your digestive functions. Replacing hydrochloric acid if necessary, adding digestive enzymes if you need to or using bitter herbs that can stimulate your body's own ability to make acid and digestive enzymes. All of those things are very important. The next thing you want to do is replace any good bacteria that has been lost, either through inflammation or killing off any infections. And so, you can do things like eat fermented foods; kimchi, sauerkraut are great. You can also take a high quality probiotic, if you can find one that is spore-based. That is a good one to grab, because the spores tend to colonize better and stay in your digestive track longer. And so the next thing you want to do and this is a very important step. You want to take things that actually help to heal the digestive track lining. One of the things that I love to use is hydrolyzed collagen powder. It is so great, because it is high in the amino acid glycine. Which is great for liver detoxification, collagen is also great for skin and hair. But the collagen its self actually help to heal the GI tract lining, which is great. Besides collagen, I also really like to use l-glutamine, that's also an amino acid but it provides food for the intestinal cells and helps to regenerate them and tighten up those tight junctions that were too wide before. Also, zinc carnosine is wonderful for healing any mucosal surface. The GI tract lining and zinc specifically you want to get the carnosine form. Because that's the one that's going to have a beneficial effect for healing the GI tract. Other things that are great for healing the GI tract are N-Acetyl Glucosamine, slippery elm and aloe. All of those things are very soothing and provide a protective barrier to the lining so that your body has the opportunity to start repairing those cells. I hope you guys found this helpful. Remember to work with a qualified professional. I always like to stress the importance of testing, not guessing, because you want to make sure that any therapies you use to try to and get better are going to be safe for you and effective. I hope you guys found this useful, comment down below with any questions and I'll see you next time.

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One of the most frequent questions that I receive from patients, and also colleagues, is related to leaky-gut. Does leaky-gut really exist, or leaky-gut syndrome? Well the syndrome of what is being described, I don't think it exists. There is no such clinical entity that can be defined or encapsulated in a syndrome, but the fact that the intestine can leak I believe is now supported by so much scientific and clinical evidence that I don't think this should be an object of discussion. In the past, we thought this barrier that separates us from the environment was, you know, static and will have as a single goal to keep at bay possible enemies that could harm us. Now we understand that this is a very dynamic barrier, the largest being the intestinal barrier, that really participates in scoping the environment that surrounds us and deciding how we can interact with our surrounding environment. There is another aspect of the intestinal permeability of leaky-gut that is really taking center stage. The past proposition that to develop any kind of problem two elements were necessary and sufficient (genetic predisposition and exposure to environmental triggers) seems not to hold true anymore. In order for these two elements to interact, and therefore to develop problems, they need to physically touch each other and this is prevented by this barrier if it is functional and physiologically appropriate. When this barrier becomes dysfunctional (i.e. a "leaky-gut" in this case) then there is an easy passage of this instigator in our body that can eventually trigger, in a specific genetic background, a process of information that leads to a disease. There is also another aspect that I find extremely intriguing and an object of a great level of interest right now. That these three elements (genetic predisposition, exposure to environmental triggers, and increased permeability) are part of a much more complex syndicate of factors that will decide if we stay healthy or not. The fourth element is an immune system that is hyper-belligerent, and the fifth element seems to be the composition and function of the species in our gut, the microbiome, that can eventually decide if and when we switch from genetic predisposition to clinical outcome. Also intriguing is the fact that three of these factors (gut permeability, immune belligerence and microbiome composition and function) can highly influence each other, and therefore I really do believe that understanding more of the physiological and pathological consequences of having a functional barrier or a dysfunctional barrier will open new paradigms of knowledge of science, knowledge of the pathogenesis of this disease, and new targets for possible interventions.

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- The wide world of wellness. So many topics, so much information and sometimes misinformation. We're going to explore the complicated and sometimes confusing trends in wellness. Welcome to How Wellness Works. (upbeat music) Today, we'll be talking about leaky gut syndrome, what it is and how to address it. Leaky gut also known as increased intestinal permeability or intestinal hyperpermeability is a condition in which the tight junctions between the intestinal cells in the gastrointestinal tract tend to weaken. In a healthy individual, cells that make up the intestinal lining form a selectively permeable barrier that allows the body to absorb water and nutrients from food during the digestive process. This provides us with the nutrients we need to survive and thrive, but also acts as a defense from potentially harmful pathogens. A degree of permeability is both normal and necessary. However, when these tight junctions between the intestinal cells weaken and get, well, wider in a sense, resulting in increased intestinal permeability, this may allow entry of potentially harmful substances, like partially digested food, toxins, bacteria, and other pathogens right into the bloodstream, hence the name, leaky gut. When these substances pass through the single-cell thick intestinal layer, they meet the immune system on the other side, resulting in a wide variety of symptoms, including, but certainly limited to, food sensitivities, digestive issues such as chronic constipation or diarrhea, nutrient malabsorption, inflammatory skin conditions, cognitive issues such as memory problems or brain fog, fatigue, headaches, joint pain, and even autoimmune diseases. While leaky gut syndrome is well-known in the naturopathic and integrative medical field, the condition has yet to be recognized in conventional practice. And you are still unlikely to hear the term used in your MD's office. However, we are now seeing new research emerging indicating a relationship between increased intestinal permeability and a number of health conditions. These include irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, Celiac disease, chronic inflammatory conditions like arthritis, obesity, and Type One diabetes. What causes leaky gut and what can we do about it? While genetic predisposition may play a role, several other factors that may affect gut health and contribute to increased intestinal permeability are things like irritants including certain foods or components of food like gluten, which is a protein found in wheat and some other grains, also, certain medications like NSAIDs, acid blocking medications or immunosuppressants, excessive alcohol consumption or excessive antibiotic use. There's other things like environmental toxins, a poor diet, nutrient deficiencies, infections including bacterial, viral, yeast infections, and poor gut health or bacterial imbalances. And of course, there's also chronic or excessive stress that may contribute to this. The good news is apart from genetics, many of these factors are totally within our control. And the best way to address the leaky gut is to follow the four Rs. You wanna remove, replace, reinnoculate, and repair. So first, remove pathogens and inflammatory triggers. Removing things like parasites, yeast or bacteria may involve treatment with medications, antibiotics, and anti-microbial herbs and supplements. It is also important to remove inflammatory foods such as processed foods, refined carbohydrates and sugar, alcohol, caffeine, and potential foods sensitivities. If you're not sure what's causing a reaction, an IgG or IgA food sensitivity test, or an elimination diet can help you uncover any potential food sensitivities for each individual. Replace, replace with essential nutrients to reduce inflammation and support digestive health. Nutrient-rich vegetables and fruits, anti-inflammatory herbs and spices, sprouted seeds and legumes, bone broth, wild-caught fish, consume plenty of high-fiber foods to support digestive health as well. Supplements to support proper digestion include digestive enzymes, hydrochloric acid, and bile acids. All right, and then there's reinnoculate. You've gotta reinnoculate with beneficial bacteria. Probiotics can help ensure a healthy balance of intestinal flora, that's the bacteria in your gut. Try including fermented foods in your diet like yogurt or kefir, kimchi, sauerkraut and kombucha, which all contain probiotics. And then our final R is repair with gut healing ingredients. Ingredients that can help soothe and repair your GI tract include zinc carnosine, L-glutamine, arabinogalactan, omega-3 fish oils, vitamin A, C, and E and herbs such as aloe vera, deglycerized licorice, something known as DGL, slippery elm and marshmallow root can also be beneficial. You think you have leaky gut? There's actually zonulin and lactulose tests that may be able to provide some answers. Consider seeing an integrative health practitioner to help determine the cause of your symptoms and provide the best treatment options. Also, if you're experiencing this, certainly like this post and comment below 'cause we're gonna keep this conversation going. (upbeat music)